All posts by Egil Mosbron

Today: The late Lee Morgan was born in 1938 – 74 years ago

From Wikipedia:

Edward Lee Morgan (July 10, 1938, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania – February 19, 1972, New York City) was an American hard bop trumpeter.

From Allmusic (Steve Huey):

A cornerstone of the Blue Note label roster prior to his tragic demise, Lee Morgan was one of hard bop’s greatest trumpeters, and indeed one of the finest of the ’60s. An all-around master of his instrument modeled after Clifford BrownMorgan boasted an effortless, virtuosic technique and a full, supple, muscular tone that was just as powerful in the high register. His playing was always emotionally charged, regardless of the specific mood: cocky and exuberant on up-tempo groovers, blistering on bop-oriented technical showcases, sweet and sensitive on ballads. In his early days as a teen prodigy, Morgan was a busy soloist with a taste for long, graceful lines, and honed his personal style while serving an apprenticeship in Art Blakey‘s Jazz Messengers.

As his original compositions began to take in elements of blues and R&B, he made greater use of space and developed an infectiously funky rhythmic sense. He also found ways to mimic human vocal inflections by stuttering, slurring his articulations, and employing half-valved sound effects. Toward the end of his career, Morgan was increasingly moving into modal music and free bop, hinting at the avant-garde but remaining grounded in tradition. He had already overcome a severe drug addiction, but sadly, he would not live to continue his musical growth; he was shot to death by his common-law wife in 1972.

Bassist Bob Cranshaw played on Lee Morgan’s immortal “The Sidewinder.” Here, he remembers the session, and offers his thoughts on the great trumpeter, who died tragically at the age of 33:

Album of the day:

The Penguin Guide to Jazz selected this album as part of its suggested “Core Collection” (with a crown) calling the title track “a glorious 24-bar theme as sinuous and stinging as the beast of the title. It was both the best and worst thing that was ever to happen to Morgan before the awful events of 19 February 1972.” The album was identified by Scott Yanow in his Allmusic essay “Hard Bop” as one of the 17 Essential Hard Bop Recordings.

Other July-10:

Continue reading Today: The late Lee Morgan was born in 1938 – 74 years ago

Today: The Rolling Stones released the “Honky Tonk Women” single in 1969 – 43 years ago

I met a gin soaked, bar-room queen in memphis,
She tried to take me upstairs for a ride.
She had to heave me right across her shoulder
Cause I just can’t seem to drink you off my mind.

From Wikipedia:

Honky Tonk Women” is a 1969 hit song by The Rolling Stones. Released as a single on 4 July 1969 in the United Kingdom and a week later in the United States, it topped the charts in both nations.

B-side “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”
Released 4 July 1969 (UK)
11 July 1969 (US)
Format 7″
Recorded June 1969
Olympic Studios, London
Genre Hard rock
Length 3:02
Label Decca F.12952 (UK)
London 45.910 (US)
Writer(s) Jagger/Richards
Producer Jimmy Miller

Two versions of the song were recorded by the band: the familiar hit which appeared on the 45 single and their collection of late 1960s singles, Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2); and a honky-tonk version entitled “Country Honk” with slightly different lyrics, which appeared on Let It Bleed. The concert rendition of the song featured on Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! differs from both the hit version and the country version, with a markedly different guitar introduction and an entirely different second verse, but is much closer to the single version than the album version.

Live from Hide Park, London – 1969:

Live from Madison Sq Garden, NYC – Nov 1969:

album of the day:

 

Other July-4:

Continue reading Today: The Rolling Stones released the “Honky Tonk Women” single in 1969 – 43 years ago

Today: The late Brian Jones passed away in 1969 – 43 years ago

From Wikipedia:

Lewis Brian Hopkins Jones (28 February 1942 – 3 July 1969), was an English musician and a founder member of The Rolling Stones.

Jones’ main instruments were the guitar and the harmonica, but he played a wide variety of other musical instruments and was a talented multi-instrumentalist. His innovative use of traditional or folk instruments, such as the sitar and marimba, was integral to the changing sound of the band.


 

Originally the leader of the group, Jones’ fellow bandmembers Mick Jagger and Keith Richards soon overshadowed him; especially after they became a successful songwriting team. He developed a serious drug abuse problem over the years and his role in the band steadily diminished. He was asked to leave the Rolling Stones in June 1969 and guitarist Mick Taylor took his place in the group. Jones died less than a month later by drowning in the swimming pool at his home on Cotchford Farm in East Sussex.

Original Stones bassist Bill Wyman stated about Jones: “…he formed the band. He chose the members. He named the band. He chose the music we played. He got us gigs … Very influential, very important, and then slowly lost it – highly intelligent – and just kind of wasted it and blew it all away.”

The Rolling Stones – “Carol” – 1964:

In the spirit of Brian Jones.. and considering that the crucial blues masterpiece “Muddy Waters at Newport 1960” also has it’s birthday, I choose this album as album of the day:

Other July-03:

Continue reading Today: The late Brian Jones passed away in 1969 – 43 years ago

Today: Chet Atkins passed away in 2001 – 11 year ago

From Wikipedia:

Chester Burton “Chet” Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an American guitarist and record producer who, along with Owen Bradley, created the smoother country music style known as the Nashville sound, which expanded country’s appeal to adult pop music fans as well.

From Allmusic:

Without Chet Atkins, country music may never have crossed over into the pop charts in the ’50s and ’60s. Although he is an exceptionally talented guitarist with hundreds of solo records to his credit, Atkins’ largest influence came as a session musician and a record producer. During the ’50s and ’60s, he helped create the Nashville sound, a style of country music that owed nearly as much to pop as it did to honky tonk.
— Stephen Thomas Erlewine 

Industry awards

Country Music Association

  • 1967 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1968 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1969 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1981 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1982 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1983 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1984 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1985 Instrumentalist of the Year
  • 1988 Instrumentalist of the Year

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

  • Inducted in 1973

Grammy Awards

  • 1971 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Jerry Reed – Me and Jerry
  • 1972 Best Country Instrumental Performance – “Snowbird”
  • 1975 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Merle Travis – The Atkins-Travis Traveling Show
  • 1976 Best Country Instrumental Performance – “The Entertainer”
  • 1977 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Les Paul – Chester and Lester
  • 1982 Best Country Instrumental Performance – Country After All These Years
  • 1986 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Mark Knopfler – “Cosmic Square Dance”
  • 1991 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Mark Knopfler – “So Soft, Your Goodbye”
  • 1991 Best Country Vocal Collaboration with Mark Knopfler – “Poor Boy Blues”
  • 1993 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Jerry Reed – Sneakin’ Around
  • 1993 Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award’
  • 1994 Best Country Instrumental Performance with Asleep at the WheelEldon ShamblinJohnny GimbleMarty Stuart, Reuben “Lucky Oceans” Gosfield & Vince Gill – “Red Wing”
  • 1995 Best Country Instrumental Performance – “Young Thing”
  • 1997 Best Country Instrumental Performance – “Jam Man”

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

  • Posthumously inducted in 2002

w/ Earl Klugh – “Goodtime Charlie’s Got The Blues”:

Album of the day:

Other June 30:

Continue reading Today: Chet Atkins passed away in 2001 – 11 year ago