All posts by Hallgeir

The Songs he didn’t write: Bob Dylan and Clydie King sings Abraham, Martin and John





Abraham, Martin and John is a 1968 song written by Dick Holler and first recorded by Dion. It is a tribute to the memory of four assassinated Americans, all icons of social change, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy and Robert F. Kennedy. It was written in response to the assassination of King and that of Robert Kennedy in April and June 1968, respectively.

It has been covered by many artists, among them are Patti Labelle, Whitney Houston, Marvin Gaye and Bob Dylan.

Bob Dylan did the song live in 1980 and 1981, here is a great clip, with Clydie king, from the DVD/film, Trouble no more: A musical film:
Continue reading The Songs he didn’t write: Bob Dylan and Clydie King sings Abraham, Martin and John

December 2: Bob Dylan live in Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 1975

bob dylan toronto 1975

Another fine show, which is filmed for Renaldo and Clara, although none of the footage is used. The set includes a rare solo performance of “Mr. Tambourine
Man.”
~Clinton Heylin (Bob Dylan: A Life in Stolen Moments Day by Day 1941-1995)

Maple Leaf Gardens
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
2 December 1975

  • Bob Dylan (vocal, guitar)
  • Bob Neuwirth (guitar)
  • T-bone J. Henry Burnett (guitar)
  • Roger McGuinn (guitar)
  • Steven Soles (guitar)
  • Mick Ronson (guitar)
  • David Mansfield (steel guitar, violin, mandolin ,dobro)
  • Rob Stoner (bass)
  • Howie Wyeth (piano, drums)
  • Luther Rix (drums, percussion)
  • Ronee Blakeley (vocal)

Continue reading December 2: Bob Dylan live in Toronto, Ontario, Canada – 1975

December 1: Bob Dylan live in Toronto, Canada 1975

bob dylan toronto 1975

The evening show is at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens. In a terrific 22- song set, Dylan does a three-song solo spot that includes the first 197 5 version of “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue.” Dylan’s mother, Beatty, joins her son on stage for the encore.
~Clinton Heylin (Bob Dylan: A Life in Stolen Moments Day by Day 1941-1995)

Maple Leaf Gardens
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
1 December 1975

  • Bob Dylan (vocal, guitar)
  • Bob Neuwirth (guitar)
  • T-bone J. Henry Burnett (guitar)
  • Roger McGuinn (guitar)
  • Steven Soles (guitar)
  • Mick Ronson (guitar)
  • David Mansfield (steel guitar, violin, mandolin ,dobro)
  • Rob Stoner (bass)
  • Howie Wyeth (piano, drums)
  • Luther Rix (drums, percussion)
  • Ronee Blakeley (vocal)

Continue reading December 1: Bob Dylan live in Toronto, Canada 1975

Bob Dylan Covers: Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash – It Ain’t Me, Babe

johnny and June

The Best Dylan Covers: Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash – It Ain’t Me, Babe

It Ain’t Me Babe is a song by Bob Dylan that originally appeared on his fourth album Another Side of Bob Dylan, which was released in 1964. According to music critic Oliver Trager, this song, along with others on the album, marked a departure for Dylan as he began to explore the possibilities of language and deeper levels of the human experience.

Bob_Dylan_-_Another_Side_Of_Bob_Dylan

Within a year of its release, the song was picked up as a single by artists who were forging the folk rock movement, including The Turtles ,The Byrds and Johnny Cash with June Carter Cash.

Continue reading Bob Dylan Covers: Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash – It Ain’t Me, Babe

November 29: Bob Dylan – Third (last) session for John Wesley Harding 1967

bob-dylan-john-wesley-harding-1967

JW: John Wesley Harding – why did you call the album that?
BD: We… I called it that because I had that song John Wesley Harding. It didn’t mean anything to me. I called it that, Jann, ‘cause I had the song John Wesley Harding, which started out to be a long ballad. I was gonna write a ballad on… Like maybe one of those old cowboy… You know, a real long ballad. But in the middle of the second verse, I got
tired. I had a tune, and I didn’t want to waste the tune, it was a nice little melody, so I just wrote a quick third verse, and I recorded that. But it was a silly little song….
~Bob Dylan to Jann Wenner November 29, 1969

This quiet masterpiece, which manages to sound both authoritative and tentative (a mix that gave it a highly contemporary feel), is neither a rock nor a folk album—and certainly isn’t folk-rock. It isn’t categorisable at all.
~Michael Gray (The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia)

47 years ago Bob Dylan entered Columbia Studio A, Nashville Tennessee tempting his third (and final) recording session for “John Wesley Harding”.

Continue reading November 29: Bob Dylan – Third (last) session for John Wesley Harding 1967