Category Archives: Bob Dylan albums

January 20: Bob Dylan Released Blood On The Tracks in 1975





blood-on-the-tracks-album-cover

A lot of people tell me they enjoy that album. It’s hard for me to relate to that. I mean, you know, people enjoying the type of pain, you know.
~Bob Dylan (to Mary Travers April 1975)

Well, Blood On The Tracks did consciously what I used to do unconsciously. I didn’t perform it well, I didn’t have the power to perform it well, but I did write the songs; they can be changed but the idea was right…
~Bob Dylan (to Matt Damsker, September 1978)

In stunning, total contrast to the previous album, Before the Flood, this 16th Dylan album triumphantly shows more subtlety and nuance than anything he’d ever done, and as honed a use of understatement as on John Wesley Harding. At the time this was the most unexpected leap of Dylan’s career. After years of comparatively second-rate work and a considerable decline in his reputation, here was an album to stand with Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde.
~Michael Gray (The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia)

Early one mornin’ the sun was shinin’
I was layin’ in bed
Wond’rin’ if she’d changed at all
If her hair was still red
Her folks they said our lives together
Sure was gonna be rough
They never did like Mama’s homemade dress
Papa’s bankbook wasn’t big enough
And I was standin’ on the side of the road
Rain fallin’ on my shoes
Heading out for the East Coast
Lord knows I’ve paid some dues gettin’ through

Tangled up in blue

Continue reading January 20: Bob Dylan Released Blood On The Tracks in 1975

Bob Dylan – The Times They Are a-Changin’ (released Jan 13, 1964)

Dylan_The_Times_They_Are_A_Changin_front

The message isn’t in the words, …. I don’t do anything with a sort of message.
I’m just transferring my thoughts into music. Nobody can give you a message like that.
~Bob Dylan (to Ray Coleman, May 1965)

Dylan’s third album reflects his mood in August-October 1963. It is also a product for his need to live up to and expand on the role he found himself in, topical poet, the restless young man with something to say, singing to and for a new generation.
~Paul Williams (Bob Dylan Performing Artist I: The Early Years 1960-1973)

Released January 13, 1964 – 54 years ago today…  it is one of his weakest albums from the 60’s.. and still a fantastic album.

“The Times They Are A-Changin'” @ The White House in Feb 2010:

The Lonesome Death Of Hattie Carroll – 5/7/65 – Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England:

Oh, but you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears
Bury the rag deep in your face
For now’s the time for your tears
(The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll)

The story I took out of the newspaper and I only changed the words.
~Bob Dylan (to Steve Allen, Feb 1964)

Continue reading Bob Dylan – The Times They Are a-Changin’ (released Jan 13, 1964)

November 29: Bob Dylan released Real Live in 1984

bob dylan real live

Martha Quinn: Will this tour help you reach a new generation?
Bob Dylan: I don’t reach anybody. They find me. They find me. It’s not for me to go out and reach
somebody. If they can find me, they find me, and if they don’t, they don’t. That’s the
way it’s always been. I don’t think it’s gonna change now just because I’m such an old
man and it’s nineteen-eighty… what is it?
– Martha Quinn interview for MTV, backstage Wembley Stadium, 7 July 1984

Highway 61 Revisited (video from Wembley, London – Real Live performance):

Wikipedia:

Released November 29, 1984
Recorded mid-1984
Genre Hard rock
Length 50:15
Label Columbia
Producer Glyn Johns

Continue reading November 29: Bob Dylan released Real Live in 1984

November 26: Bob Dylan’s The Bootleg Series Vol.5 Live 1975 was released 2002

bootlegseries5

“I was just sitting outside my house one day thinking about a name for this tour, when all of a sudden, I looked into the sky and I heard a boom! Then, boom, boom, boom, boom, rolling from west to east. So I figured that should be the name.”
– Bob Dylan

This is my favorite of Bob Dylan’s bootleg series, and one of the best live albums ever released.

The Rolling Thunder Revue was a concert tour  Bob Dylan with a traveling caravan of notable musicians, including Joan Baez,Roger McGuinn, and Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. Bob Neuwirth assembled the backing musicians, including T-Bone Burnett, Mick Ronson, David Mansfield, Steven Soles, and from the Desire sessions, violinist Scarlet Rivera, bassist Rob Stoner, and drummer Howie Wyeth. The tour included 57 concerts in two legs—the first in the American northeast and Canada in the fall of 1975, and the second in the American south and southwest in the spring of 1976.

rolling_TORONTO

Tangled up in Blue:

Continue reading November 26: Bob Dylan’s The Bootleg Series Vol.5 Live 1975 was released 2002

November 7: Did Bob Dylan invent the modern box-set with Biograph?

Biograph is a box set compilation spanning the career of Bob Dylan, released on November 7, 1985 by Columbia Records. Consisting of 53 released and unreleased tracks from 1962 to 1981, the box set was released as both a five-LP set and a three-compact disc set. Biograph reached #33 on the Billboard 200 in the US and has been certified platinum by the RIAA. I first got the vinyl box-set in 85, since then I’ve sold the vinyl box and got the cd box set.

Biograph is widely considered to be the first modern box set. Even if I think I had a Springsteen 12inch collection on vinyl before Biograph. That set lacked the scope and packaging of the Dylan set, and Biograph kind of set the standard for box sets to come.

Continue reading November 7: Did Bob Dylan invent the modern box-set with Biograph?