Category Archives: Bob Dylan other

March 12-13: Bob Dylan – Hotel Room in Denver 1966





bob dylan 1966

…When Dylan and Robbie Robertson arrive at their Denver hotel at 3AM, they jam in Dylan’s hotel room for an hour. Shelton tapes the session on his portable reel-to-reel. Although it is just three days after Dylan completed Blonde 0n Blonde, Dylan and Robertson work on three new songs that, had they been given titles and not simply forgotten by Dylan, might have been called “Positively Van Gogh,” “Don’t Tell Him,” and “If You Want My Love.” Dylan then plays “Just Like a Woman” and “Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands” for Shelton’s benefit, before deciding it is time to get some sleep.
~Clinton Heylin (Bob Dylan: A Life in Stolen Moments Day by Day 1941-1995)

Although the sound quality is bad this is wonderful stuff for some of us…

The music can be found on cd #6 in the bootleg “collection”: Jewels & Binoculars (26CD set).

A Hotel Room
Denver, Colorado
12–13 March 1966

Continue reading March 12-13: Bob Dylan – Hotel Room in Denver 1966

March 6: Ben Keith Was Born in 1937 – Here Playing With Bob Dylan on “Wallflower” (audio)

Ben Keith performs at The Cutting Room on July 19, 2007 in New York City

Bennett Keith Schaeufele (March 6, 1937 – July 26, 2010), better known by his stage name Ben Keith, was an American musician and record producer. Known primarily for his work as a pedal steel guitarist with Neil Young, Keith was a fixture of the Nashville country music community in the 1950s and 1960s before working with numerous successful rock, country and pop artists as both a producer and versatile, multi-instrumentalist sideman for over four decades.

Continue reading March 6: Ben Keith Was Born in 1937 – Here Playing With Bob Dylan on “Wallflower” (audio)

March 6: David Gilmour was born in 1946 – here playing Dylan’s Like A Rolling Stone




David Jon Gilmour, CBE (born 6 March 1946) singer, songwriter, composer, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. He joined Pink Floyd as guitarist and co-lead vocalist in 1968, effectively as a replacement for founder Syd Barrett, who left the band shortly afterwards.

Pink Floyd achieved international success with the albums The Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here, Animals, and The Wall. By the early 1980s, they had become one of the most critically acclaimed and best-selling acts in the history of popular music; it was estimated that by 2012 the band had sold over 250 million records. Following the departure of Roger Waters, David Gilmour assumed leadership of Pink Floyd in 1985.

David Gilmour talks about his early musical influences, being given a Bob Dylan album from his parents, and learning to sing and play guitar:

David Gilmour – Like a Rolling Stone (demo 1983, audio):

– Hallgeir




February 20: Bob Dylan Martin Bronstein Interview, Montreal (audio) 1966

bob dylan on the phone - 1966

MB: Do you consider yourself a poet or a songwriter?
BD: I don’t consider myself either one of those two things. I did when I first heard the words, you know, of course – “songwriter” – you hear that when you’re very young. “Poet,” I never heard that word really. I never really could think of myself as such until I came to New York and then for a while I did think I was a poet, but I don’t consider myself anymore from seeing all the rest of the people who’re called poets too and I just don’t like to refer to myself as a poet because it puts you in a category with a lot of funny people, you know

Place Des Arts
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
20 February 1966

  • Released in the UK on ON THE CREST OF THE AIRWAVES VOLUME ONE, Music Melon MMLTDBOX12, 13 February 2012.
  • Released on The Classic Interviews 1965-1966, Chrome Dreams CIS2003, 19 May 2003.

Continue reading February 20: Bob Dylan Martin Bronstein Interview, Montreal (audio) 1966

February 20: Bob Dylan at the Grammys 1991

bob dylan 1991 grammy

To see and hear how the band looked and sounded in February 1991, you just need to view television footage of the Grammy awards ceremony from New York on the 20th , when Dylan was given a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Dylan’s appearance caused a media stir par excellence on two counts. Talking point one was his performance; number two was his acceptance speech.

Dylan performed his damning anti-war3 indictment, “Masters Of War” – a striking choice given that the Gulf War was still going on and hawkish jingoism was rife. However, since he chose to sing it without a pause for breath, and backed by this hapless/hamstrung band, no-one who did not already know the song would have got the message. In fact, many who were familiar with the song did not even recognise it. Not only did Dylan’s nasal passages sound blocked (he later revealed he’d had a cold) but it seemed he had swallowed a burst of helium before starting to sing. Some observers thought he was singing in Hebrew. The tuxedoed crowd looked on in utter bewilderment. The next day’s newspapers marvelled how only Dylan had performed a song with any meaning and purpose, but then, being Dylan, he had made it completely incomprehensible.
~Andrew Muir (One More Night: Bob Dylan’s Never Ending Tour)

Bob Dylan receives his Lifetime Achievement Award. The award is presented by Jack Nicholson.

Continue reading February 20: Bob Dylan at the Grammys 1991