Category Archives: Bob Dylan video

July 24: Bob Dylan: “Mr. Tambourine Man”, Newport Folk Festival 1964 (video)

Bob Dylan Newport 1964

Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine Man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come followin’ you

Freebody Park
Newport, Rhode Island
24 July 1964
Newport Folk Festival, afternoon workshop.
Dylan played 2 songs:

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July 18: Bob Dylan: What Can I Do For You? – Mannheim, West Germany 1981 (Video)

bob dylan europe 1981

You have given everything to me
What can I do for You?
You have given me eyes to see
What can I do for You?

Pulled me out of bondage and You made me renewed inside
Filled up a hunger that had always been denied
Opened up a door no man can shut and You opened it up so wide
And You’ve chosen me to be among the few
What can I do for You?

Eisstadion
Mannheim, West Germany
18 July 1981

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July 16: Watch Bob Dylan & Norah Jones: I Shall Be Released Seattle 2005

bob dylan norah jones

They say ev’rything can be replaced
Yet ev’ry distance is not near
So I remember ev’ry face
Of ev’ry man who put me here
I see my light come shining
From the west unto the east
Any day now, any day now
I shall be released

Benaroya Hall
Seattle, Washington
16 July 2005
Amazon.com 10th Anniversary Event

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Bob Dylan’s Songs: Rainy Day Women #12 & 35

Well, they’ll stone ya when you’re trying to be so good
They’ll stone ya just a-like they said they would
They’ll stone ya when you’re tryin’ to go home
Then they’ll stone ya when you’re there all alone
But I would not feel so all alone
Everybody must get stoned

Rainy Day Women happens to deal with a minority of, you know, cripples and orientals and, uh, you know, and the world in which they live, you realize, you know, you understand, you know. It’s another sort of a North Mexican kind of a thing, uh, very protesty. Very, very protesty. And, uh, one of the protestiest of all things I ever protested against in my protest years. But, uh…
~Bob Dylan (to Klas Burling – April 1966)

The memorable joke in the chorus is about marijuana (although it could just as easily be about alcohol), but the song as a whole is about persecution, specifically criticism, and the message in the chorus is a straightforward one: it happens to everybody, so don’t feel bad (and, implicitly, don’t be such a victim about it).
The combination drunk party/revival meeting sound of the song is wonderful, a product of the unique musical chemistry Dylan and the Nashville studio musicians (under the leadership of Charlie McCoy and producer Bob Johnston, with help from Kooper and Robertson) achieved during these freewheeling ses- sions. This is not country music. This is not Dylan music as defined by any earlier Dylan album. It’s only rock and roll in the broadest, most all-encompassing sense..
-Paul Williams

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July 12: Watch Bob Dylan´s Only Ever Performance of “Hey Joe” @ Juan-Les-Pins, France – 1992

hey joe bob

“Hey Joe” is an American popular song from the 1960s that has become a rock standard and as such has been performed in many musical styles by hundreds of different artists. “Hey Joe” tells the story of a man who is on the run and planning to head to Mexico after shooting his unfaithful wife. However, diverse credits and claims have led to confusion as to the song’s true authorship and genesis. The earliest known commercial recording of the song is the late-1965 single by the Los Angeles garage band The Leaves; the band then re-recorded the track and released it in 1966 as a follow-up single which became a hit.

Continue reading July 12: Watch Bob Dylan´s Only Ever Performance of “Hey Joe” @ Juan-Les-Pins, France – 1992