Category Archives: Otis Redding

Robbie Robertson: The night Bob Dylan offered Otis Redding to record Just Like a Woman

robertson

Robbie Robertson talks about recommending Otis Redding to cover Dylan’s “Just Like a Woman”, but it never came to be. Well, they did record it but he couldn’t sing the bridge (according to Mr. Robertson)…very interesting stuff!

On the commentary track included on the Criterion edition of the Monterey Pop film , D.A. Pennebaker said that he first saw Redding when Dylan took him to see Redding at the Whiskey on April 7th 1966.

Check out: September 9 –  Otis Redding was born in 1941

Bob Dylan played some of Otis Redding’s songs on The Theme Time Radio Hour radio show: “Cigarettes and Coffee”, “I’ve Got Dreams to Remember”, and a “Stay in school” ad.

– Hallgeir

September 9: Otis Redding was born in 1941

otis redding

September 9: Otis Redding was born in 1941

 Otis Redding was soul, but Otis Redding was country, too. That was a point on which he always insisted, and that was the way others saw him. His strength was his simplicity, even if the simplicity was hard-won. The basis for his music was sincerity, not spectacular showmanship; he was at heart a stand-up singer whose power came from his ability to inspire…
~Peter Guralnick

Check out: Robbie Robertson: The night Bob Dylan offered Otis Redding to record Just Like a Woman

Sitting on the dock of the bay:

Continue reading September 9: Otis Redding was born in 1941

The Best Songs – ” Rock Me Baby”

From Wikipedia:

Rock Me Baby” is a blues standard that has become one of the most recorded blues songs of all time. When B.B. King released “Rock Me Baby” in 1964, it became a Top 40 hit reaching #34 in the Billboard Hot 100.  The song is based on earlier blues songs and has been interpreted and recorded by a variety of artists.

B.B. King’s “Rock Me Baby” is based on “Rockin’ and Rollin'”, a song recorded by Lil’ Son Jackson in 1950 (Imperial 5113). King’s lyrics are nearly identical to Jackson’s, although instrumentally the songs are different. “Rockin’ and Rollin'” is a solo piece, with Jackson’s vocal and guitar accompaniment, whereas “Rock Me Baby” is an ensemble piece.

Rock me baby, rock me all night long
Rock me baby, honey, rock me all night long
I want you to rock me baby,
like my back ain’t got no bone

Continue reading The Best Songs – ” Rock Me Baby”

Documentary: Otis Redding – Soul Ambassador

soul ambassador

Otis Redding Soul Ambassador. Documentary from the BBC.

First-ever TV documentary about the legendary soul singer Otis Redding, following him from childhood and marriage to the Memphis studios and segregated Southern clubs where he honed his unique stage act and voice. Through unseen home movies, the film reveals how Otis’s 1967 tour of Britain dramatically changed his life and music.

After bringing soul to Europe he returned to conquer America,first with the ‘love-crowd’ at the Monterey Festival and then with Dock of the Bay, which topped the charts only after his death at just 26. Includes rare and unseen performances, intimate interviews with Otis’s wife and daughter, and with original band members Steve Cropper and Booker T Jones. Also featured are British fans whose lives were changed by seeing him, among them Rod Stewart, Tom Jones and Bryan Ferry.

– Hallgeir

Today: The Dock Of The Bay by Otis Redding was released in 1968


Otis-Redding-The-Dock-of-the-Bay

“…It’s two thousand miles I roamed, just to make this dock my home.”

This should have been the start of a magnificent career, instead it gives us,  in a fine and vital way, Otis Redding’s place in soul music at that time. It was released posthumously (and it was the first of many).

The songs are chosen by Steve Cropper (produces and guitar player) and he did a remarkable job, it must have been a difficult task to assemble this album, the first after Otis’s death. It could have been a cash-in and a dark memorial album but instead we got lively, and fitting presentation of Otis’s fantastic abilities.

The album consists of singles, A and B-sides, a one hit duet with Carla Thomas, and some previously unreleased tracks (1966-1967). It IS a mixed bag, but in a good way!

Otis Redding – (Sittin’ on) The Dock Of The Bay (Official video):

I love the album and think Steve Cropper did the best job any one could do when putting it together. The choices are not obvious but we get a good representation of what Otis Redding was about and what he could do. A sad but vivid soul classic!

In 2003, the album was ranked number 161 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

My favorite track is the incredible ballad, I Love You More Than Words Can Say.

Otis Redding – The Dock of the Bay (Spotify):

– Hallgeir