Category Archives: Stevie Wonder

Stevie Wonder and Bob Dylan – The Connection





bob dylan stevie wonder

“If anybody can be called a genius, he can be. I think it has something to do with his ear, not being able to see or whatever. I go back with him to about the early ‘60s, when he was playing at the Apollo with all that Motown stuff. If nothing else, he played the harmonica incredible, I mean truly incredible. Never knew what to think of him really until he cut Blowin’ In The Wind. That really blew my mind, and I figured I’d better pay attention. I was glad when he did that Rolling Stones tour, cuz it opened up his scene to a whole new crowd of people, which I’m sure has stuck with him over the years. I love everything he does. It’s hard not to. He can do gut-bucket funky stuff really country and then turn around and do modern-progressive whatever you call it. In fact, he might have invented that. he is a great mimic, can imitate everybody, doesn’t take himself seriously and is a true roadhouse musician all the way, with classical overtones, and he does it all with drama and style. I’d like to hear him play with an orchestra. He should probably have his own orchestra.”
~Bob Dylan (about Stevie Wonder – 9 February 1989, Rolling Stone featurette on Stevie Wonder)

Stevie Wonder birthday today (born May 13, 1950):

In this post I will connect Stevie Wonder & Bob Dylan.

  1. Stevie Wonder covering Bob Dylan
  2. Stevie Wonder & Bob Dylan performing together
  3. Bob Dylan about Stevie Wonder (quotes)
  4. May 13: Happy birthday Stevie Wonder (born 1950)

Continue reading Stevie Wonder and Bob Dylan – The Connection

August 3: Stevie Wonder released Innervisions in 1973

Steviewonder_innervisions

42  year anniversary for my favorite Stevie Wonder album, Innervisions!

Innervisions is the sixteenth album by American musician Stevie Wonder , released August 3, 1973 on Motown Records; a landmark recording of his “classic period”. The nine tracks of Innervisions encompass a wide range of themes and issues: from drug abuse in “Too High,” through social anger in “Living for the City,” to love in the ballads “All in Love is Fair” and “Golden Lady.”

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As with many of Stevie Wonder’s albums the lyrics, composition and production are almost entirely his own work, with the ARP synthesizer used prominently throughout the album. This instrument was a common motif among musicians of the time because of its ability to construct a complete sound environment. Wonder was the first black artist to experiment with this technology on a mass scale, and Innervisions was hugely influential on the subsequent future of commercial black music. He also played all or virtually all instruments on six of the album’s nine tracks, making most of Innervisions a representative one-man band.

From Allmusic (John Bush):

When Stevie Wonder applied his tremendous songwriting talents to the unsettled social morass that was the early ’70s, he produced one of his greatest, most important works, a rich panoply of songs addressing drugs, spirituality, political ethics, the unnecessary perils of urban life, and what looked to be the failure of the ’60s dream — all set within a collection of charts as funky and catchy as any he’d written before. Two of the highlights, “Living for the City” and “Too High,” make an especially deep impression thanks to Stevie’s narrative talents; on the first, an eight-minute mini-epic, he brings a hard-scrabble Mississippi black youth to the city and illustrates, via a brilliant dramatic interlude, what lies in wait for innocents.   … ->Read more

Stevie Wonder – Innervisions – Promo – In Studio Performances and Interview 1973, released just before the album:

Continue reading August 3: Stevie Wonder released Innervisions in 1973

May 13: Happy birthday Stevie Wonder (born 1950)

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May 13: Happy birthday Stevie Wonder (born 1950)

Do you know, it’s funny, but I never thought of being blind as a disadvantage, and I never thought of being black as a disadvantage.
~Stevie Wonder

“If anybody can be called a genius, he can be. I think it has something to do with his ear, not being able to see or whatever. I go back with him to about the early ‘60s, when he was playing at the Apollo with all that Motown stuff. If nothing else, he played the harmonica incredible, I mean truly incredible. Never knew what to think of him really until he cut Blowin’ In The Wind. That really blew my mind, and I figured I’d better pay attention. I was glad when he did that Rolling Stones tour, cuz it opened up his scene to a whole new crowd of people, which I’m sure has stuck with him over the years. I love everything he does. It’s hard not to. He can do gut-bucket funky stuff really country and then turn around and do modern-progressive whatever you call it. In fact, he might have invented that. he is a great mimic, can imitate everybody, doesn’t take himself seriously and is a true roadhouse musician all the way, with classical overtones, and he does it all with drama and style. I’d like to hear him play with an orchestra. He should probably have his own orchestra.”
~Bob Dylan (Feb 1989, Rolling Stone Mag. – featurette on Stevie Wonder)

Superstition (1974)

Continue reading May 13: Happy birthday Stevie Wonder (born 1950)

The Best Dylan covers: Stevie Wonder – Blowin’ in the wind

blowin in the wind stevie wonder 1

The Best Dylan covers: Stevie Wonder – Blowin’ in the wind

“Blowin’ in the Wind” is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 and released on his album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan in 1963. Although it has been described as a protest song, it poses a series of rhetorical questions about peace, war and freedom. The refrain “The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind” has been described as “impenetrably ambiguous: either the answer is so obvious it is right in your face, or the answer is as intangible as the wind”.

In 1994, the song was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 2004, it was ranked #14 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.

Stevie Wonder – Blowin’ in the Wind (Studio version, 1966):

Continue reading The Best Dylan covers: Stevie Wonder – Blowin’ in the wind

Video of the day: Stevie Wonder with The Rolling Stones Uptight and Satisfaction

stevie and mick

“Stevie Wonder is second fiddle to no one.”
– The New York Post

The Rolling Stones American Tour 1972, often referred to as the S.T.P. Tour (for Stones Touring Party), was a much-publicized and much-written-about concert tour of The United States and Canada in June and July 1972 by The Rolling Stones. Rock critic Dave Marsh would later write that the tour was “part of rock and roll legend” and one of the “benchmarks of an era.”

Stevie Wonder was the support act for the tour.

Stevie Wonder and The Rolling Stones – Uptight/Satisfaction (live, 1972):

Continue reading Video of the day: Stevie Wonder with The Rolling Stones Uptight and Satisfaction