June 25: Bob Dylan @ NYNEX Arena, Manchester, England 1998 (Full concert video)

bob dylan manchester 1998

Dylan couldn’t top that [Van Morrison], we thought. But he did. It was a night in which two enigmatic geniuses showed their finest form, both still scratching the creative itch long after many of their peers have descended into mediocrity.
~Paul Taylor (Manchester Evening News)

This was a double bill with Van Morrison.

NYNEX Arena Manchester
Manchester, England
25 June 1998

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & guitar)
  • Bucky Baxter (pedal steel guitar & electric slide guitar)
  • Larry Campbell (guitar)
  • Tony Garnier (bass)
  • David Kemper (drums & percussion)

Continue reading June 25: Bob Dylan @ NYNEX Arena, Manchester, England 1998 (Full concert video)

Bob Dylan: Unreleased Gem – Am I Your Stepchild?





Oakland, California on November 13th, 1978

You mistreat me, baby, I can’t see no reason why
You know that I’d kill for you, and I’m not afraid to die
You treat me like a stepchild
Oh, Lordy, like a stepchild
I wanna turn my back and run away from you
but oh, I just can’t leave you babe

Interview – 2 December 1978 – Municipal Auditorium, Nashville, Tennessee

Q: Do you do any new songs in concert now?
BD: Once in awhile we do some, yeah.
Q: How have they been responded to?
BD: Ah, fine.
Q: Will you be doing any tonight?
BD: We’ll probably do one or two, maybe one.
Q: What is your favorite one?
BD: Well, I don’t know if I’ll record it. But I have a song called “Baby, Am I Your Stepchild?”
Q: Is that different from a lot of the songs on Street Legal?
BD: No. Umm, content-wise, it’s not. It’s a more simplified version of, ah, just a man talking to a woman, who is just not treating him properly.

Am I Your Stepchild?

Words and music Bob Dylan
Played around 50 times during the fall 1978 tour, with constantly changing lyrics.

Never recorded in Studio.

Continue reading Bob Dylan: Unreleased Gem – Am I Your Stepchild?

June 24: Bob Dylan: Glasgow, Scotland 2004 (videos)





bob dylan glasgow 2004

One of the worst things people can say when writing a book like this is “You really had to be there”. Yet, for, “Like A Rolling Stone”, that night, “you really had to be there”. Dylan’s voice was a blurred burr and yet powerful and compelling as it competed with a deafening crowd throughout this epic song.
~Andrew Muir (One More Night: Bob Dylan’s Never Ending Tour)

Barrowland
Glasgow, Scotland
24 June 2004

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & piano)
  • Stu Kimball (guitar)
  • Larry Campbell (guitar, mandolin, pedal steel guitar & electric slide guitar)
  • Tony Garnier (bass)
  • George Recile (drums & percussion)

Continue reading June 24: Bob Dylan: Glasgow, Scotland 2004 (videos)

June 24: Bob Dylan – Love Sick, Birmingham, England 1998 (video)





bob dylan birmingham 1998

I’m walking through streets that are dead
Walking, walking with you in my head
My feet are so tired, my brain is so wired
And the clouds are weeping

NEC Arena
National Exhibition Center
Birmingham, England
24 June 1998

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & guitar)
  • Bucky Baxter (pedal steel guitar & electric slide guitar)
  • Larry Campbell (guitar)
  • Tony Garnier (bass)
  • David Kemper (drums & percussion)

Continue reading June 24: Bob Dylan – Love Sick, Birmingham, England 1998 (video)

The Songs he didn’t write: Bob Dylan House of the rising sun





The House of the Rising Sun is a traditional folk song, sometimes called Rising Sun Blues. It tells of a life gone wrong in New Orleans; many versions also urge a sibling to avoid the same fate. The most successful commercial version was recorded in 1964 by The Animals.

Bob Dylan recorded it, as House of the risin’ sun,  for his debut album released in 1962. He did it several more times both live and in studio.

Album version:

Like many classic folk ballads, The House of the Rising Sun is of uncertain authorship. Musicologists say that it is based on the tradition of broadside ballads, and thematically it has some resemblance to the 16th-century ballad The Unfortunate Rake. According to Alan Lomax, “Rising Sun” was used as the name of a bawdy house in two traditional English songs, and it was also a name for English pubs. He further suggested that the melody might be related to a 17th-century folk song, “Lord Barnard and Little Musgrave”, also known as “Matty Groves”, but a survey by Bertrand Bronson showed no clear relationship between the two songs. Lomax proposed that the location of the house was then relocated from England to New Orleans by white southern performers. However, Vance Randolph proposed an alternative French origin, the “rising sun” referring to the decorative use of the sunburst insignia dating to the time of Louis XIV, which was brought to North America by French immigrants. Continue reading The Songs he didn’t write: Bob Dylan House of the rising sun

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