Bruce Springsteen and Joe Strummer

When asked for his opinion on the subject/the man/the musician Bruce Springsteen in 1997, Joe Strummer sent the following letter to “rocumentary” filmmaker Mark Hagen. The film in question, ‘Bruce Springsteen: A Secret History’, was broadcast in 1998 on British television:

London Calling, with Dave Grohl, Elvis Costello and the Clash:

Springsteen returned the compliment during a gig in 2008, declaring Strummer “one of the greatest rockers of all time” before launching into a rendition of I Fought the Law.

I Fought the Law:

He has also covered Joe’s last masterpiece Coma Girl.

Coma Girl (audio only):

The Guardian:

On the Saturday night of Glastonbury you may be lucky enough to seeBruce Springsteen & the E Street Band power through their version of the Clash’s London Calling. One key figure in securing the Boss’s booking? One of that song’s co-authors, Joe Strummer. (refering to the letter in this post)

London Calling:

cont. The Guardian:

It’s a sentiment that Glastonbury organiser Emily Eavis would agree with; in his later years, Strummer became a figurehead for the festival and when it came time to persuade Springsteen to appear, he still had a significant part to play. “I did an eight-page document about the festival for Bruce with quotes from Joe included,” says Eavis. “I’ve never done anything like that for anyone before. It’s going to be an amazing couple of hours.”

A nice story about two great persons and musicians!

– Hallgeir

Today: Bob Dylan released “Slow Train Coming” in 1979 – 33 years ago

Sometimes I feel so low-down and disgusted
Can’t help but wonder what’s happenin’ to my companions
Are they lost or are they found
Have they counted the cost it’ll take to bring down
All their earthly principles they’re gonna have to abandon?
There’s a slow, slow train comin’ up around the bend

From Wikipedia:

Released August 20, 1979
Recorded April 30-May 11, 1979
Genre Rock, gospel, Christian rock
Length 46:19
Label Columbia
Producer Jerry Wexler
Barry Beckett

Slow Train Coming is singer-songwriter Bob Dylan‘s 19th studio album, released by Columbia Records in August 1979.

It was the artist’s first effort since becoming a born-again Christian, and all of the songs either express his strong personal faith, or stress the importance of Christian teachings and philosophy. The evangelical nature of the record alienated many of Dylan’s existing fans; at the same time, many Christians were drawn into his fan base. Slow Train Coming was listed at #16 in the 2001 book CCM Presents: The 100 Greatest Albums in Christian Music.

The album was generally well-reviewed in the secular press, and the single “Gotta Serve Somebody” became his first hit in three years, winning Dylan the Grammy for best rock vocal performance by a male in 1980. The album peaked at #2 on the charts in the UK and went platinum in the US, where it reached #3.

Track listing:

All songs were written by Bob Dylan.
Side one

  1. “Gotta Serve Somebody” – 5:22
  2. “Precious Angel” – 6:27
  3. “I Believe in You” – 5:02
  4. “Slow Train” – 5:55

Side two

  1. “Gonna Change My Way of Thinking” – 5:25
  2. “Do Right to Me Baby (Do Unto Others)” – 3:50
  3. “When You Gonna Wake Up” – 5:25
  4. “Man Gave Names to All the Animals” – 4:23
  5. “When He Returns” – 4:30

5 best songs.. according to me:

  1. Slow Train
  2. Gotta Serve Somebody
  3. When He Returns
  4. I Believe In You
  5. Precious Angel

Continue reading Today: Bob Dylan released “Slow Train Coming” in 1979 – 33 years ago

Today: Robert Plant is 64

From Wikipedia:

Birth name Robert Anthony Plant
Born 20 August 1948 (age 64)
West Bromwich, (then Staffordshire, now West Midlands), England
Origin Kidderminster, Worcestershire,
England
Genres Rock, hard rock, heavy metal, blues rock, folk rock, world music, country rock
Occupations Singer-songwriter, musician
Instruments Vocals, harmonica, percussion, guitar,bass guitar
Years active 1966–present
Labels Atlantic, Swan Song, Es Paranza,Sanctuary, Mercury, Universal, Rounder
Associated acts Band of JoyLed ZeppelinThe HoneydrippersPage and PlantStrange SensationAlison KraussThe New Yardbirds

Robert Anthony Plant, CBE (born 20 August 1948) is an English singer and songwriter best known as the vocalist and lyricist of the rock band Led Zeppelin. He has also had a successful solo career. In 2007, Plant released Raising Sand, an album produced by T-Bone Burnett with American bluegrass soprano Alison Krauss, which won the 2009 Grammy Award for Album of the Year at the 51st Grammy Awards.

With a career spanning more than 40 years, Plant is regarded as one of the most significant singers in the history of rock music, and has influenced contemporaries and later singers such as Freddie Mercury and Axl Rose. In 2006, heavy metal magazine Hit Parader named Plant the “Greatest Metal Vocalist of All Time”. In 2009, Plant was voted “the greatest voice in rock” in a poll conducted by Planet Rock. In 2011, a Rolling Stone readers’ pick placed Plant in first place of the magazine’s “Best Lead Singers of All Time”.

Legacy:

  • In 2006, heavy metal magazine Hit Parader named Plant No. 1 on their list of the 100 Greatest Metal Vocalists of All-Time, a list which included Rob Halford (2), Steven Tyler (3), Freddie Mercury (6), Geddy Lee (13), and Paul Stanley (18), all of whom were influenced by Plant. 
  • In 2008, Rolling Stone named Plant as number 15 on their list of the 100 Greatest Singers of All-Time. 
  • In 2009, he was voted the “greatest voice in rock” in a poll conducted by Planet Rock. 
  • Plant was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2009 New Year Honours for his “services to popular music”. 
  • He was included in the Q magazine’s 2009 list of “Artists Of The Century” and was ranked at number 8 in their list of “100 Greatest Singers” in 2007. 
  • In 2009, Plant also won the Outstanding Contribution to Music prize at the Q Awards.
  •  He was placed at no. 3 on SPINs list of “The 50 Greatest Rock Frontmen of All Time”.
  • On 20 September 2010 National Public Radio (NPR) named Plant as one of the “50 Great Voices” in the world.

Whole Lotta Love – live 1970:

Black Dog – Live:

No Zeppelin on Spotify.
Album of the day – Raising Sand (Plant/Krauss):

Other August-20:

Continue reading Today: Robert Plant is 64

Billy Joe Shaver – Best Songs & more…

A stone thrown from Heaven, skippin’ ‘cross the water
Would disappear in ripples left behind
A book with no cover, a rhyme with no reason
Guess i’ll always be one of the rovin’ kind

‘Cause movin’s in my soul, i guess a gypsy boy got a hold
Of somebody in my family long ago
If some night while half asleep you hear the back door softly squeak
You’ll touch my empty pillow,then you’ll know

That restless wind,is calling me again
Her warmin’ hand is tuggin’ at my soul
Summer’s gone,and winter’s comin’ on
And i can’t let it catch me standin’ in the cold

– From “Restless Wind” (one of his best songs)

“He may be the best songwriter alive
today” – Willie Nelson

«He’s a real writer like Hemmingway.
He’s timeless» – Kris Kristofferson

«Billy Joe is unique. One of a kind.
They threw away the mold. The best.»
– Robert Duvall

I’m listening to Billy Joe Shaver
And i’m reading James Joyce
-Bob Dylan (I Feel a Change Comin’ On)

Billy Joe Shaver turned 73 yesterday.

He is one of my greatest “Honky Tonk Heroes”, but due to Elvis’s  death the same day in 1977.. I could not put him first in yesterdays calendar post.

I need to honor him someway.. this is it…

«Throughout my career as a songwriter, I’ve just written songs about me – the good and the bad, the funny and the sad….. – Billy Joe Shaver

«The songs are my story…» – Billy Joe shaver

«..I’ve lost part of three fingers, broke my back, suffered a heart attack and a quadruple bypass, had a steel plate put in my neck and 136 stiches in my head, fought drugs and booze, spent the money I had, and burried my wife, son & mother in the span of one year…»… .. «I’m not proud of my misfortune – I’m proud of my survival» – Billy Joe Shaver

Continue reading Billy Joe Shaver – Best Songs & more…

Today: Miles Davis released “Kind Of Blue” in 1959 – 53 years ago

“It must have been made in heaven.”
– Jimmy Cobb

From Wikipedia:

Released August 17, 1959
Recorded March 2 and April 22, 1959, at 30th Street Studio, New York City,New York, United States
Genre Modal jazz
Length 45:44
Label Columbia
Producer Teo MaceroIrving Townsend

Kind of Blue is a studio album by American jazz musician Miles Davis, released August 17, 1959, on Columbia Records in the United States. Recording sessions for the album took place at Columbia’s 30th Street Studio in New York City on March 2 and April 22, 1959. The sessions featured Davis’s ensemble sextet, which consisted of pianist Bill Evans (Wynton Kelly on one track), drummer Jimmy Cobb, bassist Paul Chambers, and saxophonists John Coltrane and Julian “Cannonball” Adderley.

Though precise figures have been disputed, Kind of Blue has been described by many music writers not only as Davis’s best-selling album, but as the best-selling jazz record of all time. On October 7, 2008, it was certified quadruple platinum in sales by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). It has been regarded by many critics as the greatest jazz album of all time and Davis’s masterpiece.

The album’s influence on music, including jazz, rock, and classical music, has led music writers to acknowledge it as one of the most influential albums ever made. In 2002, it was one of fifty recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. In 2003, the album was ranked number 12 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

Kind of Blue was recorded in two sessions at Columbia Records’ 30th Street Studio in New York City. On March 2, the tracks “So What“, “Freddie Freeloader“, and “Blue in Green” were recorded for side one of the original LP, and on April 22 the tracks “All Blues“, and “Flamenco Sketches” were recorded, making up side two. Production was handled by Teo Macero, who had produced Davis’s previous two LPs, and Irving Townsend.

Kind of Blue isn’t merely an artistic highlight for Miles Davis, it’s an album that towers above its peers, a record generally considered as the definitive jazz album, a universally acknowledged standard of excellence. Why does Kind of Blue posses such a mystique? Perhaps because this music never flaunts its genius… It’s the pinnacle of modal jazz — tonality and solos build from the overall key, not chord changes, giving the music a subtly shifting quality… It may be a stretch to say that if you don’t like Kind of Blue, you don’t like jazz — but it’s hard to imagine it as anything other than a cornerstone of any jazz collection.
—Stephen T. Erlewine

Track listing:
All songs written and composed by Miles Davis except where noted 

1. “So What”
2. “Freddie Freeloader”
3. “Blue in Green” (Miles Davis and Bill Evans)
4. “All Blues”
5. “Flamenco Sketches” (Miles Davis and Bill Evans)

Musicians


Miles Davis – Kind of Blue 50th Anniversary:

Full album:

Album of the day:

Other August-17:

Continue reading Today: Miles Davis released “Kind Of Blue” in 1959 – 53 years ago

Focusing on Bob Dylan & related music