Video of the day: That Wasn’t Me – Brandi Carlile (feat. Kris Kristofferson)

“a song that happened by accident,
like all my favorite songs that I write do.”

She says that she listened to Border Song by Elton John and The Beatles’ Let it Be when she wrote it, and that gospel feeling that those songs have, Brandi Carlile mannages to bring into this great song, That wasn’t  Me.

Music video by Brandi Carlile performing That Wasn’t Me.

Live at Beer Creek version:

She told Rolling Stone Magazine:

“I literally could not believe my luck,” recalls Carlile about getting Kristofferson to appear in the video. “I was fortunate enough to hang out with Kris at the shoot, and he surpassed all my expectations and proved himself to be a kind, compelling and inspiring gentleman.”

Two incredibly good versions of the song!

– Hallgeir

Dawes Live at WNCW 13th of June 2012

It’s not some message written in the dark,
Or some truth that no one’s seen,
It’s a little bit of everything.

The California-based quartet Dawes has  made a name for themselves with their great harmonies and songwriting.  With roots in the great Laurel Canyon sound of Gram Parsons, David Crosby, Jackson Browne, and other 70’s west-coast icons, bandmates Taylor Goldsmith, Griffin Goldsmith, Wylie Gelber and Tay Strathairn went into WNCW’s Studio 13th of June for a great performance and talk about Middle Brother, Robbie Robertson, and of course their own great recordings.

Dawes was a great discovery for us in 2011 and they just keeps getting better.

The fantastic Million Dollar Bill:

Interview about songwriting, Middle Brother and more:

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Today: Spooner Oldham was born in 1943


(photo: Andrew Quist)

Spooner Oldham
Dewey Lindon “Spooner” Oldham (born June 14, 1943) is an American songwriter and session musician. An organist, he recorded in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and at FAME Studios on such hit R&B songs as “When a Man Loves a Woman” by Percy Sledge, “Mustang Sally” by Wilson Pickett and “I Never Loved a Man” by Aretha Franklin.
As a songwriter, Spooner Oldham teamed with Dan Penn to write such hits as “Cry Like a Baby” (The Box Tops), “I’m Your Puppet” (James and Bobby Purify), “A Woman Left Lonely” and “It Tears Me Up” (Percy Sledge).

I’m your Puppet (here with Dan Penn):

Oldham was inducted into the Rock’n Roll Hall of Fame in 2009, here’s his acceptance speech:

Other june-15:

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Documentary: Spooner Oldham and the Muscle Shoals sound

From Wikipedia:
The Muscle Shoals Sound Studio was formed in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, in 1969 when musicians Barry Beckett (keyboards), Roger Hawkins (drums), Jimmy Johnson (guitar) and David Hood (bass) (called The Swampers) left FAME Studios to create their own studio. The Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section, as they became known, was the first rhythm section to own its own studio and, eventually, its own publishing and production companies. The distinctive accompaniment and arrangements have been heard on a tremendous number of legendary recordings, including those from Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin, and the Staple Singers amongst others.

Spooner Oldham and Muscle Shoals” is a short, no budget, 4-part documentary I shot in celebration of Spooner’s induction into the Rock ‘N’ Roll Hall of Fame (created by Cory Pennington). The sound is a bit all over the place on the interviews, but it’s a facinating look into one of the most legendary studios.

Part 1:

Part 2:

Part 3:

Part 4:

Very interesting stuff!

– Hallgeir

Today: Bobby Freeman was born in 1940

 

From Wikipedia:

Bobby Freeman (born June 13, 1940) is an African-American soul singer, songwriter, and record producer who recorded for theAutumn Records label in San Francisco, California. He is best known for his 1958 hit “Do You Want To Dance?” and his 1964 Top Tenhit “C’mon and Swim”.  “Do You Want To Dance?” was covered later (as “Do You Wanna Dance”) by Del Shannon, The Beach Boys,Bette Midler, John Lennon, Cliff Richard, The Mamas & The Papas and the Ramones. “C’mon and Swim” was written and produced by twenty-year-old Sylvester Stewart, later known as Sly Stone.

Freeman began his recording career at age 14 with the Romancers who recorded briefly on the Dootone label. At 17, he scored a hit with “Do You Want To Dance?” and appeared on the pop charts with various follow-ups through 1961. In 1964, he was back in the Top Ten with the dance-craze hit “C’mon and Swim”, which reached #5.

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