Tag Archives: 1965

Bob Dylan: Nat Hentoff (The unpublished Playboy) Interview, Autum 1965 (audio)





BD: Well, I don’t like to listen to too much country and western people. I like to listen to some of their songs…
NH: Yeah.
BD: …that they sing. But I get, oh, monotonized by listening to too many. I like Buck Owens’ songs, he’s alright. And Hank Williams and Joe Williams. There all the time, easily, you can make some sort of sound.
NH: Mm.
BD: But the other people are just the songs they sing. I think.
NH: How about in the rhythm and blues and rock n’ roll fields? Who do you especially, you know… who strikes you especially?
BD: Oh, you mean just name a name?
NH: Sure, just, you know, if you’re… almost like free association… if you’re thinking in terms of just pleasure in listening, who would you think of?
BD: I’d listen to all the Motown records. I listen to Wilson Pickett. Otis Redding, I guess. Charlie Rich.

Autumn 1965
Nat Hentoff (The Playboy) Interview
The Original Unpublished Version, New York City, New York

There are two versions of this interview, the original version which you’ll find on tape and the
published version which appeared in Playboy in March 1966. To call them versions ignores the
fact that they are totally different interviews.
~Every Mind Polluting Word

Continue reading Bob Dylan: Nat Hentoff (The unpublished Playboy) Interview, Autum 1965 (audio)

August 30: Bob Dylan released Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

Bob_Dylan_-_Highway_61_Revisited

 

August 30: Bob Dylan released Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

“I never wanted to write topical songs, have you heard my last two records, Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61? It’s all there. That’s the real Dylan.”
~Bob Dylan (Frances Taylor Interview, Aug 1965)

[Highway 61] Oh yes, it goes from where I used to live… I used to live related to that highway. It ran right through my home town in Minnesota. I traveled it for a long period of time
actually. It goes down the middle of the country, sort of southwest…. lot of famous people came off that highway.
~Bob Dylan (John Cohen And Happy Traum Interview, June/July 1968)

Dylan’s sixth album and his first fully fledged eagle-flight into rock. Revolutionary and stunning, not just for its energy, freshness and panache but in its vision: fusing radical electric music—electric music as the embodiment of our whole out-of-control, nervouenergy-fuelled, chaotic civilization—with lyrics that were light-years ahead of anyone else’s, Dylan here unites the force of blues-based rock’n’roll with the power of poetry.
~Michael Gray (Bob Dylan Encyclopedia)

Like a Rolling Stone:

How does it feel
How does it feel
To be without a home
Like a complete unknown
Like a rolling stone?

Continue reading August 30: Bob Dylan released Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

August 2: Bob Dylan: 5th recording session for Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

Bob_Dylan_-_Highway_61_Revisited

 

August 2: Bob Dylan: 5th recording session for Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

“I never wanted to write topical songs,…. Have you heard my last two records, Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61? It’s all there. That’s the real Dylan.”
~Bob Dylan (to Frances Taylor – Aug 1965)

“Highway 61 Revisited is the product of a series of recording session in which Dylan is performing at his peak, pure creativeness, sheer intensity, inspired by and pulling forth equivalent performances from the musicians around him. Whichever way he turns, something new and remarkable happens.”
~Paul Williams (Bob Dylan Performing Artist I: The Early Years 1960-1973)

Studio A
Columbia Recording Studios
New York City, New York
2 August 1965
The 5th Highway 61 Revisited session, produced by Bob Johnston

Continue reading August 2: Bob Dylan: 5th recording session for Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

July 30: Bob Dylan: 4th recording session for Highway 61 Revisited 1965

Bob_Dylan_-_Highway_61_Revisited

 

July 30: Bob Dylan: 4th recording session for Highway 61 Revisited 1965

“I never wanted to write topical songs,…. Have you heard my last two records, Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61? It’s all there. That’s the real Dylan.”
~Bob Dylan (to Frances Taylor – Aug 1965)

“Dylan had not only changed his sound, but his persona, trading the folk troubadour for a streetwise, cynical hipster. Throughout the album, he embraces druggy, surreal imagery, which can either have a sense of menace or beauty, and the music reflects that, jumping between soothing melodies to hard, bluesy rock. And that is the most revolutionary thing about Highway 61 Revisited — it proved that rock & roll needn’t be collegiate and tame in order to be literate, poetic, and complex.”
~Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Wikipedia:
On July 30, Dylan and his band returned to Studio A and recorded three songs. A master take of “From a Buick 6” was recorded and later included on the final album, but most of the session was devoted to “Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window?” Dylan was unsatisfied with the results and set the song aside for a later date; it was eventually re-recorded with the Hawks in October.

Continue reading July 30: Bob Dylan: 4th recording session for Highway 61 Revisited 1965

July 29: Bob Dylan: The third recording session for Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

bob_dylan-highway_61_revisited-frontal

 

July 29: Bob Dylan The third recording session for Highway 61 Revisited in 1965

“I never wanted to write topical songs,…. Have you heard my last two records, Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61? It’s all there. That’s the real Dylan.”
~Bob Dylan (to Frances Taylor – Aug 1965)

“If you had to sum up Highway 61 Revisited in a single sentence, suffice it to say that it is the album that invented attitude and raised it to an art form. Just take a look at the cover. Nobody from Johnny Rotten to Eminem has done it better to this day.
~Nigel Williamson (The Rough Guide To Bob Dylan)

 

Studio A
Columbia Recording Studios
New York City, New York
29 July 1965
The 3rd Highway 61 Revisited session, produced by Bob Johnston

Continue reading July 29: Bob Dylan: The third recording session for Highway 61 Revisited in 1965