Tag Archives: 1966

May 27: Bob Dylan & The Hawks, London 1966





bob dylan london 1966

The final show of the 1966 world tour. Thankfully the entire acoustic half has emerged on acetate. CBS in fact recorded both nights at the Royal Albert Hall for a possible live album. Before performing “Visions of Johanna,” Dylan launches into a verbal attack on those critics who accuse him of writing drug songs, informing them the next song, “is not a drurg [sic} song. It’s just vulgar to think so.” But the highlight of this, the final 1966 acoustic set is a six-and-a-half minute “Just Like a Woman,” Dylan veering in and out of control of his phrasing. During the electric set, tempers, both on and offrhe stage, become frayed. Before “I Don’t Believe You,” Dylan announces, “I get accused of dismissing my old songs. That’s not true. I luuurve my old songs.” At the time critics are divided as to the merits of the two London shows. Ray Coleman, in Disc and Music Echo, felt that Dylan, “insults his own talents … [with} a shamble of noise.” The London Times reviewer, writing up the first London show, much preferred the acoustic set, entitling his article, “The Better Half of Dylan.” After Dylan· s motorcycle accident, though, the shows will quickly achieve mythic status.
~Clinton Heylin (Bob Dylan: A Life in Stolen Moments Day by Day 1941-1995)

Royal Albert Hall
London, England
27 May 1966

Musicians:

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & electric guitar)
  • Robbie Robertson (electric guitar)
  • Garth Hudson (organ), Rick Danko (bass)
  • Richard Manuel (piano)
  • Mickey Jones (drums)

The last three songs of the May 27 acoustic set at Royal Albert Hall are good enough to stand next to the best work of any twentieth century artist (performer, painter, poet, mathematician… )
~Paul Williams (Bob Dylan Performing Artist I: The Early Years 1960-1973)

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May 26: Bob Dylan & The Hawks in London 1966

bob dylan london 1966

In circulation from this show are three acoustic songs and three electric songs, part of the widely bootlegged Gelston acetates. Before “Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat” someone shouts something at Dylan, and he threatens, “Come up here and say that”” The offer is not taken up. Before a nine-minute “Like a Rolling Stone,” which Dylan dedicates to the Taj Mahal, he introduces the Hawks for the first and only time on the tour.
~Clinton Heylin (Bob Dylan: A Life in Stolen Moments Day by Day 1941-1995)

It’s now also released officially in The 1966 Live Recordings Box-set (disc 30).

Royal Albert Hall
London, England
26 May 1966

Musicians:

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & electric guitar)
  • Robbie Robertson (electric guitar)
  • Garth Hudson (organ), Rick Danko (bass)
  • Richard Manuel (piano)
  • Mickey Jones (drums)

Continue reading May 26: Bob Dylan & The Hawks in London 1966

(probably) May 19: Bob Dylan Ballad of a Thin Man, 1966 (Video)

bob dylan 1966 - ballad OATM

You walk into the room
With your pencil in your hand
You see somebody naked
And you say, “Who is that man?”
You try so hard
But you don’t understand
Just what you’ll say
When you get home

Because something is happening here
But you don’t know what it is
Do you, Mister Jones?

—-

Yeah, That’s a fantastic shot isn’t it? You know, that was a home-made lens, I made that lens. There was no lens like that then, it made marvelous distortions. I love it, the light would flare out.
~D.A. Pennebaker (from “Who threw the glass Magazine”)

Odeon
Glasgow, Scotland
19 May 1966

Continue reading (probably) May 19: Bob Dylan Ballad of a Thin Man, 1966 (Video)

May 17: Bob Dylan & The Hawks: Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England 1966




bob_dylan_-_live_1966_-_front

 

May 17: Bob Dylan & The Hawks: Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England 1966

The most enthralling, truthful, priceless concert performance ever issued by a great artist.
~Michael Gray (BD Encyclopedia)

The most famous bootleg in rock history, with the possible exception of Dylan’s own Basement Tapes, finally makes its official appearance 32 years after the event, and nearly 30 years after it started circulating in the underground.
~Richie Unterberger (allmusic.com)

Free Trade Hall
Manchester, England
17 May 1966

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & electric guitar)
  • Robbie Robertson (electric guitar)
  • Garth Hudson (organ)
  • Rick Danko (bass)
  • Richard Manuel (piano)
  • Mickey Jones (drums)

Continue reading May 17: Bob Dylan & The Hawks: Free Trade Hall, Manchester, England 1966

May 16: Bob Dylan released Blonde On Blonde in 1966





blonde on blonde

May 16: Bob Dylan released  Blonde On Blonde in 1966

The closest I ever got to the sound I hear in my mind was on individual bands in the Blonde on Blonde album. It’s that thin, that wild mercury sound. It’s metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up. That’s my particular sound.
~Bob Dylan (to Ron Rosenbaum – Nov 1977)

Blonde on Blonde is all resonance. The songs and their stories and evocative lines and seductive melodies inhabit a realm of sound unique to this album, different from anything created before or since by Dylan or anyone else. Dylan called it “that thin, that wild mercury sound-metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up.”
~Paul Williams (Bob Dylan Performing Artist I: The Early Years 1960-1973)

bob dylan blonde on blonde photshoot

To have followed up one masterpiece with another was Dylan’s history making achievement here…Where Highway 61 Revisited has Dylan exposing and confronting like a laser beam in surgery, descending from outside the sickness, Blonde on Blonde offers a persona awash inside the chaos…We’re tossed from song to song…The feel and the music are on a grand scale, and the language and delivery are a rich mixture of the visionary and the colloquial.
~Michael Gray (Song & Dance Man III: The Art of Bob Dylan)

Continue reading May 16: Bob Dylan released Blonde On Blonde in 1966