Tag Archives: Bob Dylan

Today: Nina Simone passed away in 2003 – 10 years ago

nina_simone 2

Jazz is a white term to define black people. My music is black classical music.
~Nina Simone

Once I understood Bach’s music, I wanted to be a concert pianist. Bach made me dedicate my life to music, and it was that teacher who introduced me to his world.
~Nina Simone

Nina Simone was one of the most gifted vocalists of her generation, and also one of the most eclectic.
~Mark Deming (allmusic.com)

Ain’t Got No…I’ve Got Life:

Wikipedia:

Birth name Eunice Kathleen Waymon
Born February 21, 1933
Tryon, North Carolina, United States
Died April 21, 2003 (aged 70)
Carry-le-Rouet, Bouches-du-Rhône, France
Genres Jazz, blues, R&B, folk, gospel
Occupations Singer, songwriter, pianist,arranger, activist
Years active 1954–2003
Labels Bethlehem, Colpix, Philips, RCA Victor, CTI, Legacy Recordings
Website http://www.ninasimone.com/

Eunice Kathleen Waymon (February 21, 1933 – April 21, 2003), better known by her stage name Nina Simone /ˈniːnə sɨˈmoʊn/, was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and civil rights activist widely associated with jazz music. Simone aspired to become a classical pianist while working in a broad range of styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop.

Born the sixth child of a preacher’s family in North Carolina, Simone aspired to be a concert pianist. Her musical path changed direction after she was denied a scholarship to the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, despite a well-received audition. Simone was later told by someone working at Curtis that she was rejected because she was black. When she began playing in a small club in Philadelphia to fund her continuing musical education and become a classical pianist she was required to sing as well. She was approached for a recording by Bethlehem Records, and her rendering of “I Loves You, Porgy” was a hit in the United States in 1958. Over the length of her career Simone recorded more than 40 albums, mostly between 1958—when she made her debut with Little Girl Blue—and 1974.

nina_simone

“Feelings” (Montreux Jazz Festival):

Her musical style arose from a fusion of gospel and pop songs with classical music, in particular with influences from her first inspiration, Johann Sebastian Bach, and accompanied with her expressive jazz-like singing in her characteristic contralto. She injected as much of her classical background into her music as possible to give it more depth and quality, as she felt that pop music was inferior to classical. Her intuitive grasp on the audience–performer relationship was gained from a unique background of playing piano accompaniment for church revivals and sermons regularly from the early age of six years old.

In the early 1960s, she became involved in the civil rights movement and the direction of her life shifted once again. Simone’s music was highly influential in the fight for equal rights in the United States. In later years, she lived abroad, finally settling in France in 1992.

nina_simone 3

Love Me Or Leave Me:

15 min clips from 1984 Interview:

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Today: Johnny Shines passed away in 1992 – 11 years ago

johnny shines

That’s what I am, a Delta bluesman. And now I’m considered the king of the Delta blues.
~Johnny Shines (1989 Living Blues Interview)

Best known as a traveling companion of Robert Johnson, Johnny Shines’ own contributions to the blues have often been unfairly shortchanged, simply because Johnson’s own legend casts such a long shadow. In his early days, Shines was one of the top slide guitarists in Delta blues, with his own distinctive, energized style; one that may have echoed Johnson’s spirit and influence, but was never a mere imitation.
~Steve Huey (allmusic.com)

Sweet Home Chicago:

Long before becoming a force in Chicago blues, Johnny Shines hoboed with Robert Johnson through Depression-era America. They hopped freights, played on street corners, shared rooms and whiskey, and made it as far north as Canada. Johnson, the Mississippi Delta’s most celebrated blues performer, perished in 1938, and for the next half-century, his spirit haunted the music of Johnny Shines. It echoed in his turnarounds, mournful bottleneck slides, impassioned lyrics, and falsetto moans. At clubs, house parties, and other gatherings, Johnny Shines was just as likely to launch into Johnson’s “Crossroads Blues,” “Terraplane Blues,” and “Sweet Home Chicago” as he was his own “Evil-Hearted Woman Blues,” “A Little Tenderness,” and “Evening Sun.”
~Jas Obrecht (jasobrecht.com)

johnny shines 2

Ramblin (live ~mid 1970’s):

Wikipedia:

Johnny Shines (April 26, 1915 – April 20, 1992) was an American blues singer and guitarist.

Birth name John Ned Shines
Born April 26, 1915
Frayser, Memphis, United States
Died April 20, 1992 (aged 76)
Genres Blues
Instruments guitar
Years active 1932–1992
Labels Chess Records
J.O.B. Records
Vanguard Records
Various

“Shines was that rare being, a blues artist who overcame age and rustiness to make music that stood up beside the work of his youth. When Shines came back to the blues in 1965 he was 50, yet his voice had the leonine power of a dozen years before, when he made records his reputation was based on”.
~Tony Russell

He was born John Ned Shines in Frayser, Memphis, United States. He spent most of his childhood in Memphis, Tennessee playing slide guitar at an early age in local “jukes” and for tips on the streets. He was “inspired by the likes of Charley Patton, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Lonnie Johnson, and the young Howlin’ Wolf”, but he was taught to play the guitar by his mother. Shines moved to Hughes, Arkansas in 1932 and worked on farms for three years putting his musical career on hold. It was a chance meeting with Robert Johnson, his greatest influence, that gave him the inspiration to return to music. In 1935, Shines began traveling with Johnson, touring the south and heading as far north as Ontario where they appeared on a local radio program. The two went their separate ways in 1937, one year before Johnson’s death.

robert johnson johnny shinesRobert Johnson & Johnny Shines

Shines played throughout the southern United States until 1941 when he settled in Chicago. There Shines found work in the construction industry but continued to play in local bars.

Sittin’ on top of the world:

Check out –> Illustrated Johnny Shines discography

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My Morning Jacket to tour with Bob Dylan – here covering his songs

 

Jim James announced some exclusive news during a video interview with Tap Milwaukee Thursday night: My Morning Jacket will be on the road with Bob Dylan this summer.

My Morning Jackets has a long relationship with Dylan’s songs and it will be great to be able to see them on the same bill.

Bob Dylan’s songs have become part of the great American songbook and there are a lot of artists covering his compositions. My Morning Jacket is one of the best and most interesting of the contemporary bands around, and their covers of Dylan are all good, some are great.

In honor of Amnesty International’s 50th anniversary, a number of musical heavyweights came together for a new Bob Dylan cover album.  Chimes of Freedom: Songs of Bob Dylan Honoring 50 Years of Amnesty International had a wonderful cover of  “You’re a Big Girl Now” done by My Morning Jacket.


This made me check around to see if My Morning Jacket had done more songs by Dylan and they had.

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Today: Otis Redding released I’ve Been Loving You Too Long in 1965 – 48 years ago

otis redding i've been loving you

Otis Redding’s “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” is an R&B hit love ballad of the ’60s that has lost none of its soulful power with the passing decades. Redding’s success with the single was second only to that of his ever-popular classic “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay.”
~Joslyn Lane (allmusic.com)

I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” became Redding’s first Top 40 single, in June 1965. And when Redding performed a scorching drawn-out version at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967 — in front of the audience he called “the love crowd” — the single made the transition from hit to legend.
~rollingstone.com

I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (Monterey ’67):

otis redding 1967 montery

Wikipedia:

Released April 19, 1965
Format 7″ single
Recorded Miami: 1965
Genre Soul
Length 2:49 (mono version, April 1965)
3:09 (stereo version, July 1965)
Label Volt/Atco
V-126
Producer Otis Redding
Jerry Butler

I’ve Been Loving You Too Long” (sometimes issued as “I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now)”) is a song written by Otis Redding and Jerry Butler. It appeared as the A-side of a 1965 hit single by Otis Redding – and subsequently appeared on his thirdalbum, Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul. Although Redding had been appearing in the U.S. Billboard Pop and R&B charts as early as 1962, this was his first big hit, reaching #21 on the Billboard Hot 100, and was his first Top 5 Billboard R&B chart, peaking at #2. The B-side of the single “Just One More Day,” was also a minor hit, reaching #15 on the R&B and #85 on the Pop chart. The song is ranked #110 on the Rolling Stone magazine’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

otis blue

Album version:

Lyrics:

I’ve Been Loving You Too Long (To Stop Now) by Otis Redding
I’ve been loving you too long to stop now

There were time and you want to be free
My love is growing stronger, as you become a habit to me
Oh I’ve been loving you a little too long
I dont wanna stop now, oh
With you my life,
Has been so wonderful
I can’t stop now

There were times and your love is growing cold
My love is growing stronger as our affair [affair] grows old
I’ve been loving you a little too long, long,
I don’t want to stop now
oh, oh, oh
I’ve been loving you a little bit too long
I don’t wanna stop now
No, no, no

Don’t make me stop now
No baby
I’m down on my knees Please, don’t make me stop now
I love you, I love you,
I love you with all of my heart
And I can’t stop now
Don’t make me stop now
Please, please don’t make me stop now
Good god almighty I love you
I love you, I love you, I love you
I love you, I love you
I love you in so many different ways…
I love you in so many different ways….

otis redding

Live 1967 – London:

Notable cover versions:

  • The first cover of the song was a recording by The Rolling Stones in 1965 — shortly after Redding’s original version became a hit.
  • The most widely known cover version of the song was by Ike & Tina Turner in 1968. It was the lead track from their 1968 Blue Thumb album entitled Outta Season.
    Live at Altamont Festival 1969:
  • Aretha Franklin recorded a cover for her album Young, Gifted and Black (1972).

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Today: The Pixies released Doolittle in 1989 – 24 years ago

the pixies doolittle-cover

..the songs on Doolittle have the power to make you literally jump out of your skin with excitement.
~NME

Doolittle is a mix of the band’s earlier hardcore storms, Black Francis’ self­described “stream of unconsciousness” rants, and the strange melodicism and surf-metal guitar that defined its creepy magic.
~rollingstone.com

Debaser:

Wikipedia:

Released April 18, 1989
Recorded October 31 – November 23, 1988 atDowntown Recorders in Boston, Massachusetts and Carriage House Studios in Stamford, Connecticut
Genre Alternative rock
Length 38:38
Label 4AD, Elektra (initial U.S. distribution)
Producer Gil Norton

Doolittle is the second studio album from the American alternative rock band Pixies, released in April 1989 on 4AD. The album’s offbeat and dark subject material, featuring references to surrealism, Biblical violence, torture and death, contrasts with the clean production sound achieved by the newly hired producer Gil Norton. Doolittle was the Pixies’ first international release, with Elektra Records acting as the album’s distributor in the United States and PolyGram in Canada.

Pixies released two singles from Doolittle, “Here Comes Your Man” and “Monkey Gone to Heaven”, both of which were chart successes on the US chart for Modern Rock Tracks. The album itself reached number eight on the UK Albums Chart, an unexpected success for the band. In retrospect, album tracks such as “Debaser”, “Wave of Mutilation”, “Monkey Gone to Heaven”, “Gouge Away”, and “Hey” are highly acclaimed by critics, while the album, along with debut LP Surfer Rosa, is often seen as the band’s strongest work.

pixies doolittle inlay

Doolittle has continued to sell consistently well in the years since its release, and in 1995 was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America. The album has been cited as inspirational by many alternative artists, while numerous music publications have ranked it as one of the most influential albums ever. A 2003 poll of NME writers ranked Doolittle as the second-greatest album of all time, and Rolling Stone placed the album at 226 on its list of “The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time”.

Tame:

Music:

Doolittle features an eclectic mix of musical styles. While tracks such as “Tame” and “Crackity Jones” are fast and aggressive, and incorporate the band’s trademark loud–quiet dynamic, other songs such as “Silver”, “I Bleed”, and “Here Comes Your Man” reveal a quieter, slower and more melodic temperament. With Doolittle, the band began to incorporate further instruments into their sound; for instance, “Monkey Gone to Heaven” features two violins and two cellos. Several tracks on Doolittle are constructed around simple repeating chord progressions.

“Tame” is based on a three chord formula; including Joey Santiago’s playing a “Hendrix chord” over the main bass progression. “I Bleed” is melodically simple, and is formed around a single rhythmical repetition. Some songs are influenced by other genres of music; while “Crackity Jones” has a distinctly Spanish sound, and incorporates G♯ and A triads over a C♯ pedal, the song’s rhythm guitar, played by Francis, starts with an eighth-note downstroke typical of punk rock music.

the pixies

the pixies here-comes-your-man

Here Comes Your Man:

Accolades:

Publication Country Accolade Year Rank
Hot Press Ireland Top 100 Albums
2006 #34
Juice Australia The 50 Best Albums of All Time
1997 #2
NME UK 100 Best Albums
2003 #2
Panorama Norway The 30 Best Albums of the Year 1970–98 1999 #1
Pitchfork Media US Top 100 Albums of the 1980s
2002 #4
Q UK Ultimate Music Collection
2005 *
Rolling Stone US The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time 2005 #226
Spin US 100 Greatest Albums, 1985–2005
2005 #36
Slant Magazine US Best Albums of the 1980s
2012 #34

Tracks:

All tracks were written by Black Francis, except where noted.

  1. “Debaser” – 2:52
  2. “Tame” – 1:55
  3. “Wave of Mutilation” – 2:04
  4. “I Bleed” – 2:34
  5. “Here Comes Your Man” – 3:21
  6. “Dead” – 2:21
  7. “Monkey Gone to Heaven” – 2:56
  8. “Mr. Grieves” – 2:05
  9. “Crackity Jones” – 1:24
  10. “La La Love You” – 2:43
  11. “No. 13 Baby” – 3:51
  12. “There Goes My Gun” – 1:49
  13. “Hey” – 3:31
  14. “Silver” (Francis/Deal) – 2:25
  15. “Gouge Away” – 2:45

Monkey Gone To Heaven:

Personnel:

Pixies
  • Black Francis – vocals, rhythm guitar
  • Kim Deal – bass guitar, vocals, slide guitar on “Silver”
  • Joey Santiago – lead guitar
  • David Lovering – drums, lead vocal on “La La Love You”, bass guitar on “Silver”
Additional musicians
  • Arthur Fiacco – cello on “Monkey Gone to Heaven”
  • Karen Karlsrud – violin on “Monkey Gone to Heaven”
  • Corine Metter – violin on “Monkey Gone to Heaven”
  • Ann Rorich – cello on “Monkey Gone to Heaven”
Production
  • Steve Haigler – mixing engineer
  • Matt Lane – assistant engineer
  • Simon Larbalestier – cover image, album booklet imagery
  • Gil Norton – production, engineering
  • Vaughan Oliver – album booklet imagery
  • Dave Snider – assistant engineer
  • Published by Rice ‘n’ Beans Music BMI

the pixies 2

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