Tag Archives: Charlie Daniels

April 9: Bob Dylan released Nashville Skyline in 1969


Bob dylan nashvilleskyline

 

April 9: Bob Dylan released Nashville Skyline in 1969

Well, Jann, I’ll tell you something. There’s not too much of a change in my singing style, but I’ll tell you something which is true… I stopped smoking. When I stopped smoking my voice changed… So drastically, I couldn’t believe it myself. That’s true. I tell you, you stop smoking those cigarettes (laughter)… and you’ll be able to sing like Caruso.
~Bob Dylan (to Jann Wenner Nov 1969)

Anyway, on Nashville Skyline you had to read between the lines. I was trying to grasp something that would lead me on to where I thought I should be, and it didn’t go nowhere – it just went down, down, down.
~Bob Dylan (to Jonathan Cott, Sept 1978)

Released 48 years ago, it surely is one of his most controversial albums.. “Embracing” classic Country music &  kicking off the “Country Rock” genre.

I’ve always liked this album… not a masterpiece, but a solid Dylan album.

#1 – Girl from the North Country (with Johnny Cash)

Continue reading April 9: Bob Dylan released Nashville Skyline in 1969

Feb 14: Bob Dylan- Third Recording Session for “Nashville Skyline” in 1969





bob dylan nashville skyline

This new album is country Dylan, a collection of unaffected and highly tuneful love songs, riding comfortably cushioned on the Nashville sound, which sometimes, as in “To Be Alone With You” or “One More Night,” is pure Country and Western, but which for the most part is just a relaxed get-together of expert musicians who seem to know each other’s – and Dylan’s – moves as if they were playing at the Grand Ole Opry.
~Hubert Saal (March 1969)

The third recording session for ‘Nashville Skyline’ took place on February 14, 1969. This time around he managed to pull out 4 master versions: “Peggy Day”, “Tell Me That It Isn’t True”, “Country Pie” and “Lay Lady Lay”.

Continue reading Feb 14: Bob Dylan- Third Recording Session for “Nashville Skyline” in 1969

Feb 13: Bob Dylan – 2nd Nashville Skyline session in 1969

bob dylan nashville skyline

Well, Jann, I’ll tell you something. There’s not too much of a change in my singing style, but I’ll tell you something which is true… I stopped smoking. When I stopped smoking my voice changed… So drastically, I couldn’t believe it myself. That’s true. I tell you, you stop smoking those cigarettes (laughter)… and you’ll be able to sing like Caruso.
~Bob Dylan (to Jann Wenner Nov 1969)

Anyway, on Nashville Skyline you had to read between the lines. I was trying to grasp something that would lead me on to where I thought I should be, and it didn’t go nowhere – it just went down, down, down.
~Bob Dylan (to Jonathan Cott, Sept 1978)

The first recording session for “Nashville Skyline” was held on February 12, 1969 – but no recordings sheets are available from this session. The second session took place the day after – February 13, 1969. Dylan landed 3 master versions this evening.

Continue reading Feb 13: Bob Dylan – 2nd Nashville Skyline session in 1969

October 28: Happy 79th birthday Charlie Daniels

charlie-daniels

I just thank God I can make a living doing something I enjoy as much as I do playing music.
~Charlie Daniels

I had been on the road for a long time and was not really getting anywhere. Bob Johnston, a friend of mine, had taken over Columbia in Nashville. He asked me if I wanted to come down. I did – thank God I did.
~Charlie Daniels

A talented and showy fiddler, Charlie Daniels and his band fuse hardcore country with a hard-edged Southern rock, boogie, and blues. The group — which has had a rotating cast of musicians over the years — has always been known for its instrumental dexterity, but Daniels and company were also notorious for their down-home, good-old-boy attitude..
~Stephen Thomas Erlewine (allmusic.com)

Charlie Daniels becomes member of the Grand Ole Opry in 2008:

“Devil Went Down to Georgia” | Live at the Grand Ole Opry:

Continue reading October 28: Happy 79th birthday Charlie Daniels

Today: Stevie Wonder released “Talking Book” in 1972 – 41 years ago

talking-book-steve wonder

 The artist breaks through and takes control, though not in that order. Suddenly he’s writing better ballads than he used to choose, and not at any sacrifice of his endearing natural bathos (if you have doubts about “Sunshine of My Life,” try “Blame It on the Sun”). “Maybe Your Baby” and “Big Brother” continue his wild multi-voice experiments but come in out of left field. And “Superstition” translates his way of knowledge into hard-headed, hard-rocking political analysis.
~Robert Christgau

From Wikipedia:

Released October 28, 1972
Recorded 1972
Genre Soul, funk
Length 43:31
Label Tamla
Producer Stevie Wonder, Robert Margouleff,Malcolm Cecil

Talking Book is the fifteenth album by Stevie Wonder, released on October 28, 1972. A signal recording of his “classic period”, in this one he “hit his stride.” The album’s first track, “You Are the Sunshine of My Life”, earned Wonder his first Grammy Award, for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance.

Superstition live on Sesame Street:

Sandwiched between the release of Music of My Mind and InnervisionsTalking Book saw Wonder enjoying more artistic freedom from Motown. Guest appearances include Jeff Beck, Ray Parker, Jr., David Sanborn, and Buzz Feiten. The sound of the album is sharply defined by Wonder’s keyboard work, especially with the synthesizers he incorporated, giving a funky edge to tracks like “Maybe Your Baby”. His use of the Hohner clavinet model C on “Superstition” is widely regarded as one of the definitive tracks featuring the instrument. His swinging clavinet and harmonica embellishments on “Big Brother”, though, defy categorization.

Stevie_Wonder-Talking_Book-Interior_Frontal

Reception:

Released after Wonder toured with the Rolling Stones in 1972, Talking Book became an immediate hit. The popular appeal of the recording helped destroy the myth that R&B artists were incapable of creating music that could be appreciated by rock audiences, and marked a unique period for R&B artists (especially Motown artists).

  • Talking Book peaked at #3 on the Pop Albums chart, and became the first album for Wonder to top the Top R&B Albums chart where it remained for three weeks.
  • Wonder won three awards for Talking Book at the 1974 Grammys: Best Male Pop Vocal Performance for “You Are the Sunshine of My Life”, and both Best Male R&B Vocal Performance and Best R&B Song for “Superstition”.
  • Incidentally, at the same ceremony, Wonder’s next album, Innervisions, won Album of the Year and Talking Book’s producers Malcolm Cecil and Robert Margouleff won the Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical award for their work on that album.
  • In 2003, the album was ranked number 90 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

You are The Sunshine of My Life – Rainbow Theatre in London. Feb 1974:

Songs

  1. “You Are the Sunshine of My Life” 2:58
  2. “Maybe Your Baby” 6:51
  3. “You and I (We Can Conquer the World)” 4:38
  4. “Tuesday Heartbreak” 3:02
  5. “You’ve Got It Bad Girl” (Wonder, Yvonne Wright) 4:59
  6. “Superstition” 4:26
  7. “Big Brother” 3:34
  8. “Blame It on the Sun” (Wonder, Syreeta Wright) 3:26
  9. “Looking for Another Pure Love” (Wonder, Syreeta Wright) 4:43
  10. “I Believe (When I Fall in Love It Will Be Forever)” (Wonder, Yvonne Wright)

 

Album of the day – Talking Book (1972):

From allmusic.com – John Bush:
After releasing two “head” records during 1970-71, Stevie Wonder expanded his compositional palate with 1972’s Talking Book to include societal ills as well as tender love songs, and so recorded the first smash album of his career. What had been hinted at on the intriguing project Music of My Mind was here focused into a laser beam of tight songwriting, warm electronic arrangements, and ebullient performances — altogether the most realistic vision of musical personality ever put to wax, beginning with a disarmingly simple love song, “You Are the Sunshine of My Life” (but of course, it’s only the composition that’s simple). Stevie’s not always singing a tender ballad here — in fact, he flits from contentment to mistrust to promise to heartbreak within the course of the first four songs — but he never fails to render each song in the most vivid colors. In stark contrast to his early songs, which were clever but often relied on the Motown template of romantic metaphor, with Talking Book it became clear Stevie Wonder was beginning to speak his mind and use personal history for material (just as Marvin Gaye had with the social protest of 1971’s What’s Going On).   … read more over @ allmusic.com

Other October 28:

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