Tag Archives: Daniel Lanois

Bob Dylan’s Oh Mercy covered

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“Oh Mercy (1989) is a collection of 10 songs, best listened to at night, if you’re inclined to take that gypsy caravan down into a mythic Louisiana bayou, a world conjured up by Bob Dylan and producer Daniel Lanois. Virtually every song is a highlight, from “Political World” (which sounds just as immediate today) to the bittersweet “Shooting Star.” It’s quite an ethereal voyage from beginning to end and should withstand the test of time.”
– Josh Downham (user review, Amazon)

It is a great collection of songs and there are many artists that have tried their luck in singing them, none as good as Dylan’s original versions (as usual) but there are some good ones out there. I have tried to collect some of the best.

My three favorites are Gordon Lightfoot, Tom Jones and Willie Nelson.

Check Out:
Blood on the tracks covered
Highway 61 Revisited covered

 

Patti Rain – Political World:

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Bob Dylan: Mercy On Us (Oh Mercy outtakes)

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Since we just posted: Bob Dylan: Infidels outtakes (Rough cuts) it feels right to get this post flying as well.

Great outtakes from the “Oh Mercy” sessions.

The Studio
New Orleans, Louisiana
7-29 March 1989

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Bob Dylan: 4th Oh Mercy recording session, 12 March 1989

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“Most of them are stream-of-consciousness songs, the kind that come to you in the middle of the night, when you just want to go back to bed. The harder you try to do something, the more it evades you. These weren’t like that.”
~Bob Dylan (to Edna Gundersen, Sept 1989)

The Studio
New Orleans, Louisiana
12 March 1989
4th Oh Mercy recording session, produced by Daniel Lanois

  1. Most Of The Time
  2. Most Of The Time
  3. Most Of The Time
    “Most of The Time” is a “big song,” a major work, the sort of listening experience that brings people back to an album again and again.
    ~Paul Williams (BD Performing Artist 86-90 & Beyond)

    Overdubbed: Malcolm Burns (bass) 19 April 1989
    Released on: Oh Mercy – 19 September 1989

    Continue reading Bob Dylan: 4th Oh Mercy recording session, 12 March 1989

Today: Bob Dylan recorded “Shooting Star” in 1989 – 24 years ago

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“Shooting star” was his first album closer since “Every Grain of Sand” to share that slightly somnambulant feel, a gorgeous melody, caressed vocal and an abiding conviction that there are two kinds of people, good (i.e. saved) and lost people.
~Clinton Heylin (Still On The Road)

MTV Unplugged version:

Grooveshark:

Spotify:

Where:

The Studio
New Orleans, Louisiana
14 or 15 March 1989
6th Oh Mercy recording session, produced by Daniel Lanois

Songs:

  1. Everything Is Broken
  2. Everything Is Broken
  3. Everything Is Broken
  4. Jam
  5. Three Of Us Be Free
  6. Three Of Us Be Free
  7. Shooting Star
  8. Shooting Star
  9. Shooting Star
  10. Shooting Star
  11. Shooting Star
  12. Shooting Star
  13. Shooting Star
  14. Shooting Star

Master version of “Everything is Broken” was also recorded @ this session.

Lyrics:

Seen a shooting star tonight
And I thought of you
You were trying to break into another world
A world I never knew
I always kind of wondered
If you ever made it through
Seen a shooting star tonight
And I thought of you

Seen a shooting star tonight
And I thought of me
If I was still the same
If I ever became what you wanted me to be
Did I miss the mark or overstep the line
That only you could see?
Seen a shooting star tonight
And I thought of me

Listen to the engine, listen to the bell
As the last fire truck from hell
Goes rolling by
All good people are praying
It’s the last temptation, the last account
The last time you might hear the sermon on the mount
The last radio is playing

Seen a shooting star tonight
Slip away
Tomorrow will be
Another day
Guess it’s too late to say the things to you
That you needed to hear me say
Seen a shooting star tonight
Slip away

Check out -> Bob Dylan “Oh Mercy”

Album of the day:

Other March-14:

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Today: Gram Parsons passed away in 1973 – 39 years ago

From Wikipedia:

Birth name Ingram Cecil Connor III
Born November 5, 1946
Winter Haven, Florida
Origin Waycross, Georgia
Died September 19, 1973 (aged 26)
Joshua Tree, California
Genres Country, country rock, rock
Occupations Singer-songwriter, guitarist,pianist
Instruments Vocals, guitar, piano, organ
Years active 1963–1973
Labels Reprise, A&M
Associated acts International Submarine Band
The Byrds
The Flying Burrito Brothers
Emmylou Harris
Website gramparsons.com

Gram Parsons (November 5, 1946 – September 19, 1973) was an American singer, songwriter, guitarist and pianist. Parsons is best known for his work within the country genre; he also mixed blues, folk, and rock to create what he called “Cosmic American Music”. Besides recording as a solo artist, he also worked in several notable bands, including the International Submarine BandThe Byrds, and The Flying Burrito Brothers. His career, though short, is described by Allmusic as “enormously influential” for both country and rock, “blending the two genres to the point that they became indistinguishable from each other.”

Born in 1946, Parsons emerged from a wealthy but troubled childhood to attend Harvard University. He founded the International Submarine Band in 1966, and after several months of delay their debut, Safe at Home, was released in 1968, by which time the group had disbanded. Parsons joined The Byrds in early 1968, and played a pivotal role in the making of the seminal Sweetheart of the Rodeo album.

After leaving the group in late 1968, Parsons and fellow Byrd Chris Hillman formed The Flying Burrito Brothers in 1969, releasing their debut, The Gilded Palace of Sin, the same year. The album was well received but failed commercially; after a sloppy cross-country tour, they hastily recorded Burrito Deluxe. Parsons was fired from the band before its release in early 1970. He soon signed with A&M Records, but after several unproductive sessions he canceled his intended solo debut in early 1971. Parsons moved to France, where he lived for a short period at Villa Nellcôte with his friend Keith Richards of The Rolling Stones.

Returning to America, Parsons befriended Emmylou Harris, who assisted him on vocals for his first solo record, GP, released in 1973. Although it received enthusiastic reviews, the release failed to chart; his next album, Grievous Angel (released posthumously in 1974) met with a similar reception, and peaked at number 195 on Billboard. Parsons died of a drug overdose on September 19, 1973 in hotel room 8 at the Joshua Tree Inn at Joshua Tree, California, at the age of 26.

Since his death, Parsons has been recognized as an extremely influential artist, credited with helping to found both country rock and alt-country. His posthumous honors include the Americana Music Association “President’s Award” for 2003, and a ranking at No. 87 on Rolling Stones list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time.”

Stephen Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic describes Parsons as “enormously influential” for both country and rock, “blending the two genres to the point that they became indistinguishable from each other. … His influence could still be heard well into the next millennium.”

In his essay on Parsons for Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Greatest Artist” list, Keith Richards notes that Parsons’ recorded music output was “pretty minimal.” But nevertheless, Richards claims that Parsons “effect on country music is enormous[, t]his is why we’re talking about him now.”

The Flyin Burrito Brothers – Chritina’s Tune:

Gram & Emmylou – Streets of Baltimore (Bad quality, but GREAT stuff!!):

A Great documentary about Gram from BBC – “Fallen Angel”:

Album of the day – Grievous Angel (1974):

Other September 19:

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