Tag Archives: Johnny Ace

Classic song: Bob Dylan & Joan Baez Never Let Me Go (Johnny Ace)

Bob Dylan & Joan Baez 1975

 

Classic song: Bob Dylan & Joan Baez Never Let Me Go (Johnny Ace)

Just let me love you tonight.
Forget about tomorrow.
My darling, won’t you hold me tight,
And never let me go.

Dry your eyes, no tears, no sorrow.
Cling to me with all your might,
And never let me go.

The music of the late ‘50s and early ‘60s when music was at that root level—that for me is meaningful music. The singers and musicians I grew up with transcend nostalgia—Buddy Holly and Johnny Ace are just as valid to me today as then.
~Bob Dylan (to Maureen Orth, Jan 1974)

Continue reading Classic song: Bob Dylan & Joan Baez Never Let Me Go (Johnny Ace)

May 3: James Brown Birthday

james brown

When I’m on stage, I’m trying to do one thing: bring people joy. Just like church does. People don’t go to church to find trouble, they go there to lose it.
~James Brown

The one thing that can solve most of our problems is dancing.
~James Brown

“Soul Brother Number One,” “the Godfather of Soul,” “the Hardest Working Man in Show Business,” “Mr. Dynamite” — those are mighty titles, but no one can question that James Brown earned them more than any other performer. Other singers were more popular, others were equally skilled, but few other African-American musicians were so influential over the course of popular music. And no other musician, pop or otherwise, put on a more exciting, exhilarating stage show: Brown’s performances were marvels of athletic stamina and split-second timing.
~Richie Unterberger (allmusic.com)

Papa’s Got a Brand New Bag – from TV program Shindig:

Continue reading May 3: James Brown Birthday

June 09 in music history

Bob Dylan: Another Side Of Bob Dylan recording session, 9 June 1964 (read more)

In May Dylan went to London for a concert at the Royal Festival Hall. Afterwards he and Victor Maimudes visited Paris and a small town in Greece, where Dylan worked on songs for his next album. Back in New York, June· 9, 1964, Dylan went into the recording studio with Tom Wilson, a couple of bottles of wine, and a small crowd of friends, and recorded his entire fourth album, Another Side of Bob Dylan, in a single evening.
~Paul Williams (Bob Dylan Performing Artist I: The Early Years 1960-1973)

another side of Bob Dylan

 36 years ago: The Rolling Stones released Some Girls in 1978 (read more)

The Stones’ best album since Exile on Main Street is also their easiest since Let It Bleed or before. They haven’t gone for a knockdown uptempo classic, a “Brown Sugar” or “Jumping Jack Flash”–just straight rock and roll unencumbered by horn sections or Billy Preston. Even Jagger takes a relatively direct approach, and if he retains any credibility for you after six years of dicking around, there should be no agonizing over whether you like this record, no waiting for tunes to kick in. Lyrically, there are some bad moments–especially on the title cut, which is too fucking indirect to suit me–but in general the abrasiveness seems personal, earned, unposed, and the vulnerability more genuine than ever. Also, the band is a real good one–especially the drummer. A
~Robert Christgau

 some girls cover
Nehemiah Curtis “Skip” James (June 9, 1902 – October 3, 1969) was an American Delta blues singer, guitarist, pianist and songwriter. Born in Bentonia, Mississippi, United States, he died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.Check out:

 skip james
 Jack Leroy “Jackie” Wilson, Jr. (June 9, 1934 – January 21, 1984) was an American singer and performer. Known as “Mr. Excitement“, Wilson was important in the transition of rhythm and blues into soul. He was considered a master showman, one of the most dynamic and influential singers and performers in R&B and rock history.  jackie wilson
 Johnny Ace (June 9, 1929 – December 25, 1954), born John Marshall Alexander, Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee,wasanAmericanrhythm and blues singer. He scored a string of hit singlesinthemid-1950s before dying of an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Check out:

Bob Dylan & Joan Baez: Never Let Me Go (Johnny Ace)

and

 johnny ace
 Arthur Alexander (May 10, 1940 – June 9, 1993) was an Americancountrysoul singer. Jason Ankeny, music critic for Allmusic, said Alexander was a “country-soul pioneer” and though largely unknown, “his music is the stuff of genius, a poignant and deeply intimate body of work on par with the best of his contemporaries.”  Arthur_Alexander

Spotify Playlist – June 09

Today: The Rolling Stones released Some Girls in 1978 – 35 years ago

some girls cover

Ain’t I rough enough
Ain’t I tough enough
Ain’t I rich enough
In love enough
Oooo, ooh please.

Stones-1978 1

Some Girls was released in 8 June 1978 and it was their first full album with Ronnie Wood. It’s a great album, up there with the best albums in their catalogue. They mixed in some new wave sounds, added a bit of disco and kept their soul, blues and country tinged rock’n roll. Released on the height of the punk and disco era, The Stones made this masterpiece of an album. Some Girls is very much a product of it’s time, but when Rolling Stones made a record that gave a nod to these “fads,” they did so with such anger and speed that the young people in 1978 must have been struck with envy. They certainly made an album that has stood the test of time and it’s a definitive Stones album.

The Rolling Stones prove time and again that they still have what it takes.

rolling-stones 1978 2

Here are all the songs live:

1. Miss You (1978), the eight and a half minute version, a masterpiece! The guitar work on this song (this version) is simply spectacular. I read somewhere sometimes that this was one of the songs that Prince wished he had written, and we can hear on his music that he has been influenced by this tune in a big way.

2. When the whip comes down (1978) Sleezy and cool and it kind of reminds me of Star  Star.

Yeah, mama and papa told me I was crazy to stay
I was gay in New York, a fag in L.A.
So I saved my money , and I took a plane
Wherever I go they treat me the same
When the whip comes down

3. Just My Imagination (running away with me) a soul number that fits The Stones perfectly. Very different from The Temptation version but equally good.

4. Some Girls (2008) Only The Rolling Stone s could have gotten away with these lyrics, they’re as politically incorrect as they possibly could be:

rolling stone 1978 3

White girls they’re pretty funny, sometimes they drive me mad
Black girls just wanna get fucked all night
I just don’t have that much jam
Chinese girls are so gentle, they’re really such a tease
You never know quite what they’re cookin’
Inside those silky sleeves

On “Some Girls,” Mick Jagger sounds like he’s not only singing like Bob Dylan, but about Bob Dylan: “I’ll give ya a house back in Zuma Beach/And give you half of what I owe.” (Rolling Stone Magazine)
Continue reading Today: The Rolling Stones released Some Girls in 1978 – 35 years ago