Tag Archives: Led Zeppelin

August 20: Robert Plant Birthday


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It’s sort of a feeling of power onstage. It’s really the ability to make people smile, or just to turn them one way or another for that duration of time, and for it to have some effect later on. I don’t really think it’s power… it’s the goodness.
~Robert Plant

My vocal style I haven’t tried to copy from anyone. It just developed until it became the girlish whine it is today.
~Robert Plant

Whole Lotta Love – live 1970:

Our report from Robert Plant’s concert in Bergen, Norway in 2014:

The headliner on the second day was of course, Robert Plant and his band The Sensational Space shifters. Plant revisited  surprisingly many songs from the Led Zeppelin catalog (and an appreciative audience loved it) plus some new songs and tunes from his post-Zeppelin career. The emphasis was on blues put in a historic context, very modern sounding but also true to it’s roots. He drew the lines from England to Memphis to Africa. This wasn’t a dry history lesson, but a joyful celebration of the blues art form.

Mr. Plant was in a splendid mood, joking and clearly having fun. When he did Whole Lotta Love the audience went wild, he started it as a slow call and response blues before the band kicked in into a full-blown rock’n roll anthem. He then slowed it down again and had a middle act where he incorporated a “Who do you love” segment before finishing the song in Rock heaven. So fresh, but still so true to the original song! This gentleman of Rock delivered way beyond our expectations, the concert was amazing!

 

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May 31: The late John Bonham was born in 1948

bonham in action

I think that feeling is a lot more important than technique. It’s all very well doing a triple paradiddle – but who’s going to know you’ve done it? If you play technically you sound like everybody else. It’s being original that counts.
– John Bonham

John Henry Bonham (31 May 1948 – 25 September 1980) was an English musician and songwriter, best known as the drummer of Led Zeppelin. Bonham was esteemed for his speed, power, fast right foot, distinctive sound, and “feel” for the groove. 

Led Zeppelin – Full concert Live at the Royal Albert Hall in 1970:

“Bonzo had very broad listening tastes. When we weren’t listening to James Brown or Otis Redding, he might be listening to Joni Mitchell or Crosby Stills Nash & Young. Bonzo was a great lover of songs.” – John Paul Jones

He is widely considered to be one of the greatest drummers in the history of rock music by many drummers, other musicians, and commentators in the industry. Over 30 years after his death, Bonham continues to garner awards and praise, including a Rolling Stone readers’ pick in 2011 placing him in first place of the magazine’s “best drummers of all time”.
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March 28: Led Zeppelin Houses of the Holy was released in 1973

led zeppelin houses of the holy

March 28: Led Zeppelin  Houses of the Holy  was released in 1973

“The Rain Song” is one of Zep’s finest moments, featuring a soaring string arrangement and a gentle, aching melody. “The Ocean” is just as good, starting with a heavy, funky guitar groove before slamming into an a cappella section and ending with a swinging, doo wop-flavored rave-up. With the exception of the rampaging opening number, “The Song Remains the Same,” the rest of Houses of the Holy is fairly straightforward, ranging from the foreboding “No Quarter” and the strutting hard rock of “Dancing Days” to the epic folk/metal fusion “Over the Hills and Far Away.” Throughout the record, the band’s playing is excellent, making the eclecticism of Page and Robert Plant’s songwriting sound coherent and natural.”
– Thomas Erlewine (allmusic)

#1 – The Song Remains The Same

Continue reading March 28: Led Zeppelin Houses of the Holy was released in 1973

May 31 in music history

The late John Bonham was born in 1948 – 66 years ago (read more)

John Henry Bonham (31 May 1948 – 25 September 1980) was an English musician and songwriter, best known as the drummer of Led Zeppelin. Bonham was esteemed for his speed, power, fast right foot, distinctive sound, and “feel” for the groove. 

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 Johnny Paycheck was the stage name of Donald Eugene Lytle (May 31, 1938 – February 19, 2003), a country music singer and Grand Ole Opry member most famous for recording the David Allan Coe song “Take This Job and Shove It”. He achieved his greatest success in the 1970s as a major force in country music’s “Outlaw Movement” popularized by artists such as David Allan Coe, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Billy Joe Shaver and Merle Haggard. In the 1980s, his music career suffered from his problems with drugs, alcohol, and legal difficulties. He served a prison sentence in the early 1990s but his declining health effectively ended his career in early 2000.  johnny-paycheck
 Peter Yarrow (born May 31, 1938) is an American singer who found fame with the 1960s folk music trio Peter, Paul and Mary. Yarrow co-wrote (with Leonard Lipton) one of the group’s most famous songs, “Puff, the Magic Dragon”. He is also a political activist and has lent his support to causes that range from opposition to the Vietnam War to the creation of Operation Respect.  Yarrow_Peter
Clinton “Clint” Eastwood, Jr. (born May 31, 1930) is an American actor, film director, producer and composer. He rose to international fame with his role as the Man with No Name in Sergio Leone’s Dollars trilogy of spaghetti Westerns during the 1960s, and as Harry Callahan in the five Dirty Harry films throughout the 1970s and 1980s. These roles, among others, have made him an enduring cultural icon of masculinity.
He is also a pianist and composer. Jazz has played an important role in Eastwood’s life from a young age.Eastwood composed the film scores of Mystic RiverMillion Dollar BabyFlags of Our FathersGrace Is GoneChangelingHereafterJ. Edgar, and the original piano compositions for In the Line of Fire. He wrote and performed the song heard over the credits of Gran Torino. The music in Grace Is Gone received two Golden Globe nominations by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for the 65th Golden Globe Awards.

He also directed a documentary about piano blues in Martin Scorsese’s series about the blues.

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 Johnnie Harrison Taylor (May 5, 1934 – May 31, 2000) was an American vocalist in a wide variety of genres, from rhythm and bluessoulblues and gospel to popdoo-wop and disco.“Young gospel phenom, gritty Stax/Volt soulster, lady-killing balladeer, chart-topping disco king, Southern soul-blues stalwart — Johnnie Taylor somehow always managed to adapt to the times, and he parlayed that versatility into a recording career that lasted nearly four decades. Nicknamed the “Philosopher of Soul” during his Stax days, that version of Taylor is best remembered for his 1968 R&B chart-topping smash “Who’s Making Love,” but far and away his biggest success was 1976’s across-the-board number one “Disco Lady,” the first single ever certified platinum (which at the time meant sales of over two million copies).” 
– Steve Huey (allmusic)
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Spotify Playlist – May 31

Bob Dylan’s Modern Times covered

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I like the “Bob Dylan period” we’re in right now and I like Modern Times a lot,  I play it often. I love it, one of the great albums from the first ten years of the 2000s.

This is a post where I have “dug” out some cover versions of the songs on the record, I would say that none of them are as good as the originals, but they’re good and they are interesting. Many of the album’s songs have roots in well-known older compositions, though in all cases, Dylan has given the songs new lyrics. Some of the “cover versions” I have found are interpretations of the old traditional songs, it wasn’t easy to compile this cover selection…

“Modern Times is the thirty-second studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on August 29, 2006 by Columbia Records. The album was Dylan’s third straight (following Time Out of Mind and Love and Theft) to be met with nearly universal praise from fans and critics. It continued its predecessors’ tendencies toward blues,rockabilly and pre-rock balladry, and was self-produced by Dylan under the pseudonym “Jack Frost”. Along with the acclaim, the album sparked some debate over its uncredited use of choruses and arrangements from older songs, as well as many lyrical lines taken from the work of 19th-century poet Henry Timrod.

Modern Times became the singer-songwriter’s first #1 album in the US since 1976’s Desire.”
– Wikipedia

Lets start!

Wanda Jackson sings a rousing Thunder on the mountain.
here is Wanda Jackson’s video of the great Bob Dylan song “Thunder on the Mountain,” from her Third Man / Nonesuch Records release, “The Party Ain’t Over,” features producer and band mate Jack White on guitar (great solo!), along with the Third Man House Band.

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