Tag Archives: Nat Hentoff

Bob Dylan: Nat Hentoff (The unpublished Playboy) Interview, Autum 1965 (audio)





BD: Well, I don’t like to listen to too much country and western people. I like to listen to some of their songs…
NH: Yeah.
BD: …that they sing. But I get, oh, monotonized by listening to too many. I like Buck Owens’ songs, he’s alright. And Hank Williams and Joe Williams. There all the time, easily, you can make some sort of sound.
NH: Mm.
BD: But the other people are just the songs they sing. I think.
NH: How about in the rhythm and blues and rock n’ roll fields? Who do you especially, you know… who strikes you especially?
BD: Oh, you mean just name a name?
NH: Sure, just, you know, if you’re… almost like free association… if you’re thinking in terms of just pleasure in listening, who would you think of?
BD: I’d listen to all the Motown records. I listen to Wilson Pickett. Otis Redding, I guess. Charlie Rich.

Autumn 1965
Nat Hentoff (The Playboy) Interview
The Original Unpublished Version, New York City, New York

There are two versions of this interview, the original version which you’ll find on tape and the
published version which appeared in Playboy in March 1966. To call them versions ignores the
fact that they are totally different interviews.
~Every Mind Polluting Word

Continue reading Bob Dylan: Nat Hentoff (The unpublished Playboy) Interview, Autum 1965 (audio)

Bob Dylan quotes from the 60’s





bob-dylan

This is the first post with Bob Dylan quotes from the 60’s. The post will be updated many times in the future. There will also, off course, follow posts with quotes from the 70’s, 80’s etc…

UPDATE – other posts:

These quotes are collected from song lyrics & interviews. It’s not only “great” quotes we’ve collected, but also important quotes & funny quotes.

Quotes collected from song lyrics are tried to be kept brief….  it would often be tempting to quote whole songs. Also we’ll try to limit ourselves to max 3 quotes from the same song.

Some songs are sorted under the year they were released (on record), other’s are sorted under the year they were obviously written/recorded.

Please comment/send us input, but we don’t like quotes without a source…

bob-dylan-studion 1961

1961

  • New York Times said it was the coldest winter in seventeen years
    I didn’t feel so cold then
    ~Talkin’ New York
  • Hey, hey, Woody Guthrie, I wrote you a song
    ’Bout a funny ol’ world that’s a-comin’ along
    Seems sick an’ it’s hungry, it’s tired an’ it’s torn
    It looks like it’s a-dyin’ an’ it’s hardly been born
    ~Song to Woody
    ———————————————
  • Yeah, well, I was with a carnival when I was about thirteen and I used to travel with a carnival – all kinds of shows.
    [Where] All around the Midwest. Uh, Gallup, New Mexico, then to Texas, and then… Lived in Gallup, New Mexico and…
    ~to Billy James, October 1961
  • I traveled with the carnival when I was about thirteen years old.
    All the way up to I was nineteen. Every year, off and on, I joined different carnivals.
    ~Oscar Brand Radio Show, 29 October 1961 (aired November 4)

Continue reading Bob Dylan quotes from the 60’s

Feb 18: Bob Dylan’s 5th recording session for “Nashville Skyline” (w/Johnny Cash) in 1969

bob dylan nashville skyline

I like Johnny Cash a lot. I like everything he does really.
~Bob Dylan (to Nat Hentoff – Autumn 1965)

In the end, Nashville Skyline is a lovely album but not a heavyweight contender, though its effects were major ones. Country music was despised, hick music when Dylan took it up. People were divided into the hip and the non-hip. The counterculture was in full swing and riddled with its own self-importance and snobbery. Nashville Skyline was a hard pill to swallow: but it did ’em good.
~Michael Gray (Bob Dylan Encyclopedia)

The 5th recording session for ‘Nashville Skyline’ took place on February 18, 1969. One master versions emerged.. the lovely “Girl from the North Country”. Johnny Cash shared vocal on all 38 takes…this is a highly bootlegged sessions… and people have uploaded most of it on youtube… 

bob-dylan-and-johnny-cash-tv-special
picture of Johnny Cash & Bob Dylan.. NOT from the studio sessions

 

Some background from wikipedia:

Nashville Skyline is the ninth studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released in April 1969 by Columbia Records.

Building on the rustic style he experimented with on John Wesley HardingNashville Skyline displayed a complete immersion into country music. Along with the more basic lyrical themes, simple songwriting structures, and charming domestic feel, it introduced audiences to a radically new singing voice from Dylan—a soft, affected country croon.

The result received a generally positive reaction from critics, and was a commercial success. Reaching number 3 in the US, the album also scored Dylan his fourth UK number 1 album.

bob dylan nashville skyline back

Continue reading Feb 18: Bob Dylan’s 5th recording session for “Nashville Skyline” (w/Johnny Cash) in 1969

Bob Dylan: Nat Hentoff (The unpublished Playboy) Interview, Autum 1965 (audio)

OLD post … You’re being redirected to a newer version……

 


BD: Well, I don’t like to listen to too much country and western people. I like to listen to some of their songs…
NH: Yeah.
BD: …that they sing. But I get, oh, monotonized by listening to too many. I like Buck Owens’ songs, he’s alright. And Hank Williams and Joe Williams. There all the time, easily, you can make some sort of sound.
NH: Mm.
BD: But the other people are just the songs they sing. I think.
NH: How about in the rhythm and blues and rock n’ roll fields? Who do you especially, you know… who strikes you especially?
BD: Oh, you mean just name a name?
NH: Sure, just, you know, if you’re… almost like free association… if you’re thinking in terms of just pleasure in listening, who would you think of?
BD: I’d listen to all the Motown records. I listen to Wilson Pickett. Otis Redding, I guess. Charlie Rich.

Autumn 1965
Nat Hentoff (The Playboy) Interview
The Original Unpublished Version, New York City, New York

There are two versions of this interview, the original version which you’ll find on tape and the
published version which appeared in Playboy in March 1966. To call them versions ignores the
fact that they are totally different interviews.
~Every Mind Polluting Word

Continue reading Bob Dylan: Nat Hentoff (The unpublished Playboy) Interview, Autum 1965 (audio)