Tag Archives: Neil Young

Today: Brian Wilson is 70

From Wikipedia:

Brian Douglas Wilson (born June 20, 1942) is an American musician, best known as the leader and chief songwriter of the group The Beach Boys. On stage, Wilson provided many of the lead vocals, and often harmonized with the group in falsetto. Early during his on-stage career, Wilson primarily played bass on stage, but gradually transitioned to primarily playing piano/keyboards. Besides being the primary composer in The Beach Boys, he also functioned as the band’s main producer and arranger.

Some Awards and recognitions

  • Wilson and the Beach Boys were inducted into the Rock Hall of Fame in January 1988.
  • In 2000, Wilson was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Paul McCartney introduced Brian, referring to him as “one of the great American geniuses.”
  • Pet Sounds has been ranked as one of the most influential records in popular music, and has been ranked #1 on several music magazines’ lists of the greatest albums of all time. It is ranked #2 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.
  • On May 10, 2004, Wilson was honored as a BMI Icon at the 52nd annual BMI Pop Awards. He was saluted for his “unique and indelible influence on generations of music makers.”
  • In 2005, Wilson won the Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow.
  • In November 2006, Wilson was inducted into the UK Music Hall of Fame by Pink Floyd guitarist David Gilmour. Wilson performed “God Only Knows” and “Good Vibrations” at the ceremony.
  • On December 2, 2007, the Kennedy Center Honors committee recognized Wilson for a lifetime of contributions to American culture through the performing arts in music.
  • In 2008, Rolling Stone magazine published a list of the “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”, and ranked Wilson number 52.

Smile – Live:

Some Beach Boys as well.. – Good Vibrations:

Album of the day @ JV:

Other June-20:

Continue reading Today: Brian Wilson is 70

Video premiere: Clementine by Neil Young & Crazy Horse

photo: Pegi Young

Via Spinner.com:

For Americana, Neil Young’s first album with the band Crazy Horse in nearly nine years, the singer-songwriter revisits classic American folk songs and delivers the tunes, which encompass familiar protest songs, murder ballads and campfire songs, with electrifying ferocity. In spite of — or perhaps because of the approach, the universal appeal of the songs is neither lost nor diminished and they retain their relevance in these challenging times.

Wikipedia says of the history of the song:

The words are those of a bereaved lover singing about his darling, the daughter of a miner in the 1849 California Gold Rush. He loses her in a drowning accident, though he consoles himself towards the end of the song with Clementine’s “little sister”.

The verse about the little sister was often left out of folk song books intended for children, presumably because it seemed morally questionable.
Another theory is that the song is from the view of Clementine’s father, and not a lover.

Gerald Brenan attributes the melody to originally being an old Spanish ballad in his book South from Granada. It was made popular by Mexican miners during the Gold Rush. It was also given various English texts. No particular source is cited to verify that the song he used to hear in the 1920s in a remote Spanish village was not an old text with new music, but Brenan states in his preface that all facts mentioned in the book have been checked reasonably well. The song is using the melody placed on Romances, in particular the one of Romance del Conde Olinos o Niño, a sad love story very popular in the Spanish folk some of which were compiled at the court of Alfonso X and others like the Cancionero de Uppsala later by the House of Trastamara.

It is unclear when, where and by whom the song was first recorded in English for others to hear.

The video for “Clementine” as for all of the clips produced for Americana  is authentic found footage, adding a unique visual element to a project steeped in America’s rich, lyrical history.

Clementine:

Neil Young:

“The Americana arrangement extends the folk process using many of the original words and a new melody. The song tells the story of either a bereaved lover recalling his lost sweetheart, or a father missing his lost daughter. In both cases the daughter has drowned in an accident. The verse about Clementine’s sister has been omitted from most children’s versions. This verse has different meanings depending on whether the point of view of the singer is taken as the lover or the father.”

– Hallgeir

Today: David Byrne is 60

From Wikipedia:

David Byrne (born May 14, 1952) is a musician and artist, best known as a founding member and principal songwriter of the American new wave band Talking Heads, which was active between 1975 and 1991. Since then, Byrne has released his own solo recordings and worked with various media including film, photography, opera, and non-fiction. He has received Grammy, Oscar, and Golden Globe awards and been inducted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The best songs -> Talking Heads “Psycho Killer”

Psycho Killer:

Talking Heads 77

 

Other May 14:

Continue reading Today: David Byrne is 60

Video premiere: Jesus’ Chariot (she’ll be coming round the mountain) – Neil Young & Crazy Horse

From NPR:
You’ve never heard “She’ll Be Coming Round the Mountain” quite like this. For their first album together in nine years, Neil Young and Crazy Horse have taken classic American folk music and reinvigorated these songs with muscle, radiance and a whole lot of electric guitar.

head over to their website and read more

via NPR:

This song, as with all the songs on the record, have been paired up with archival footage. This footage is from an early scene in D.W. Griffith’s controversial 1915 film Birth of a Nation, in which the Southern Cameron family hosts a farewell ball for soldiers fighting for the Confederacy.

As for the song itself, Neil Young writes in the liner notes toAmericana:

Written in the 1800s based on an old Negro spiritual, this song refers to the second coming of Jesus, and “she” is the chariot Jesus is coming on. Some interpret this as the end of the world. Others have said that “she” refers to union organizer Mary Harris “Mother” Jones going to promote formation of labor unions in the Appalachian coal-mining camps. The Americana arrangement continues the folk process with a new melody, a new title and a combination of lyric sources.

– Hallgeir