Video Premiere: Do it Anyway – Ben Folds Five

It came out a few days ago so iy isn’t brand new, but it is so good I just had to present it here. Mixing good pop and nostalgia for the Jim Henson generation.

The Official Music Video for “Do It Anyway,” the first track from Ben Folds Five’s much anticipated album THE SOUND OF THE LIFE OF THE MIND…featuring the Fraggles from Jim Henson’s “Fraggle Rock”! Also starring Rob Corddry, Anna Kendrick & Chris Hardwick.

Just a fun video to start the weekend, and so cathcy, you’ll hum along in no time, this is perfect pop.

Directed by Phil Hodges, Ben Folds Five – Do it anyway:

Here’s a nice behind the scenes video:

– Hallgeir

From the Archives of JV: Stagger Lee – Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

A Great artist with a fantastic band does tremendous versions of this old classic.

Official Video:

Great (GREAT!) Live version (with slightly altered lyrics, hehe):

Continue reading From the Archives of JV: Stagger Lee – Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds

Today: Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds released “Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus” in 2004 – 8 years ago

 

I’ve always had an obligation to creation, above all.
~Ñick Cave

People think I’m a miserable sod but it’s only because I get asked such bloody miserable questions.
~Ñick Cave


From Wikipedia:

Released 20 September 2004
Recorded March–April 2004 at Studio Ferber in Paris, France
Genre Alternative rock
Length 82:30
Label Mute
Producer Nick Launay

Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus is the thirteenth studio album by the Australian alternative rock band Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, released on 20 September 2004 on Mute Records. It is a double album with a total of seventeen songs—nine on Abattoir Bluesand eight on The Lyre of Orpheus.

The album was produced by Nick Launay at Studio Ferber in Paris in March–April 2004 and Nick Cave used The Bad Seeds line up of Mick HarveyThomas WydlerMartyn CaseyConway SavageJim SclavunosWarren Ellis, and James Johnston. It was the first album by the group for which Blixa Bargeld did not perform – English guitarist and organist Johnston, of the group Gallon Drunk, replaced Bargeld. Cave decided to split drumming duties for the two parts, with Sclavunos on Abattoir Blues and Wydler on The Lyre of Orpheus. According to Launay, the whole album was completed in twelve days.

The album’s release was supported by the Abattoir Blues Tour, which travelled through Europe from 2 November to 5 December. In January 2007 a double live album and DVD was issued as The Abattoir Blues TourAbattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus’s last track, “O Children”, was featured in the 2010 film Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 and the song is referenced as an achievement in Lego Harry Potter: Years 5-7. In March 2005, to complement the success of the double album, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds released B-Sides & Rarities, a three-disc, 56-track collection of B-sides, rarities, and tracks that had appeared on film soundtracks.

From allmusic.com – Thom Jurek:

When Blixa Bargeld left Nick Cave‘s Bad Seeds, who would have predicted his departure would result in one of the finest offerings in the band’s catalog? Abbatoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus is a double CD or, rather, two completely different albums packaged in one very handsome box with a stylish lyric booklet and subtly colored pastel sleeves. They were recorded in a total of 16 days by producer Nick Launay (Kate BushMidnight OilGirls Against BoysSilverchairINXSVirgin Prunes, et al.). Abbatoir Blues, the first disc in the set (packaged in pink, of course), is a rock & roll record. Yeah, the same guy who released theBoatman’s CallNo More Shall We Part, and Nocturama albums has turned in a pathos-drenched, volume-cranked rocker, full of crunch, punishment — and taste. Drummer Jim Sclavunos‘ aggressive, propulsive kit work is the bedrock of this set. It and Mick Harvey‘s storm-squall guitar playing shake things loose on “Get Ready for Love,” which opens the album. As Cave goes right for God in the refrain — “get ready for love” — in the maelstrom, a gospel choir roaring “praise Him” responds. His tense, ambivalent obsession with theology is pervasive; he mocks the Western perception of God in the heavens yet seeks the mystery of His nature. … read more @ allmusic

Personnel:

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds
Technical personnel
  • Nick Launay – producer, engineer, mixing
  • Lars Fox – digital audio editor
  • Ian Cooper – mastering

Get ready for Love:

Nature Boy:

Album of the day:

Other September 20:

Continue reading Today: Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds released “Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orpheus” in 2004 – 8 years ago

Video Premiere: Sunloathe by Wilco

“Sunloathe” from Wilco’s latest album “The Whole Love” on dBpm Records. Directed by Peter Glantz. Art by Nathaniel Murphy.

Stranger than usual from Wilco, set in a fairytale world with monsters and strange creatures. And a cat controlling a strange robot like man, yes really!!

Wonderful and weird, here is Sunloathe:

– Hallgeir

Gram Parsons Top 7 cover songs

Relief Block print by Stephen Alcorn

Gram Parsons was a master songwriter both on his own and in collaboration with others. It is no wonder that his songs are covered by many artists. I have picked some of the best ones and hereby present my Top 7 Gram Parsons Cover songs.

1)  Jay Farrar’s wonderful rendition of Drugstore Truck Drivin’ Man (and Christine’s Tune as a bonus). Jay Farrar has a great voice, and he’s a good performer, this music just fits. He gets to pay tribute to the country part of his roots. Just fantastic!

“He’s been like a father to me
He’s the only DJ you can hear after three
I’m an all night musician in a rock ‘n’ roll band
And why he don’t like me, I can’t understand”

Written By Gram Parsons and Roger McGuinn

From Wikipedia:

The song Drug Store Truck Drivin’ Man details a moderately unpleasant on-air exchange between Ralph Emery and Roger McGuinn, the lead singer of the 1960s rock group The Byrds, concerning their 1968 appearance at The Grand Ole Opry. In that performance, the Byrds attempted unsuccessfully to convince traditional country music fans that their developing country rock sound was a legitimate part of the tradition.

2) I’ve chosen , A song for you performed by Whiskeytown (great vocal by Ryan Adams) and performed by Justin Townes Earle.

I couldn’t just pick one them, they’re both so god dam good and very different.

Whiskeytown/Ryan Adams:

Justin Townes Earle:

“…So take me down to your dance floor
And I won’t mind the people when they stare
Paint a different color on your front door
And tomorrow we will still be there…”

Written by Gram Parsons

Here is a great compliment: “The song is absolutely hopeless, beyond despair. It’s the saddest song I’ve ever heard.” That was Rolling Stone magazine’s description of A Song for You in March 1973, reviewing the album on which it featured, GP.

3) My Uncle performed by Steve Earle.

Steve Earle is a hero of ours and a list like this would not be complete without him. That said, he gives a fantastic interpretation of My Uncle from The Flying Burrito Brothers’ Guilded Palace of Sin.

Steve Earle My Uncle:

“A letter came today from the draft board
With trembling hands I read the questionnaire
It asked me lots of things about my mama and papa
Now that ain’t what I call exactly fair
So I’m heading for the nearest foreign border
Vancouver may be just my kind of town
Because they don’t need the kind of law and order
That tends to keep a good man underground..”

Written by Chris Hillman and Gram Parsons.

Continue reading Gram Parsons Top 7 cover songs

Focusing on Bob Dylan & related music