Category Archives: Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan Covers Chuck Berry (Born October 18, 1926)

Chuck was my man. He was the one who made me say ‘I want to play guitar, Jesus Christ!’…Suddenly I knew what I wanted to do.
~Keith Richards (1992)

..if you tried to give rock and roll another name, you might call it ‘Chuck Berry’.
~John Lennon

Well, now, Chuck Berry was a rock & roll songwriter. So I never tried to write rock &
roll songs, ‘cause I figured he had just done it.
~Bob Dylan (to Kurt Loder October 1987)

Charles Edward Anderson Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) was an American singer and songwriter, and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music. With songs such as “Maybellene” (1955), “Roll Over Beethoven” (1956), “Rock and Roll Music” (1957) and “Johnny B. Goode” (1958), Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive. Writing lyrics that focused on teen life and consumerism, and developing a music style that included guitar solos and showmanship, Berry was a major influence on subsequent rock music.

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October 17: Bob Dylan first recording session for John Wesley Harding in 1967

bob-dylan-john-wesley-harding-1967

I heard the sound that Gordon Lightfoot was getting, with Charlie McCoy and Kenny Buttrey. I’d used Charlie and Kenny both before, and I figured if he could get that sound, I could…. but we couldn’t get it. (Laughs) It was an attempt to get it, but it didn’t come off. We got a different sound… I don’t know what you’d call that… It’s a muffled sound.
~Bob Dylan to Jann Wenner November 29, 1969

52 years ago today Bob Dylan started recording “John Wesley Harding”.

Some background from wikipedia:

Dylan went to work on John Wesley Harding in the fall of 1967. By then, 18 months had passed since the completion of Blonde on Blonde. After recovering from the worst of the results of his motorcycle accident, Dylan spent a substantial amount of time recording the informal basement sessions at West Saugerties, New York; little was heard from him throughout 1967. During that time, he stockpiled a large number of recordings, including many new compositions. He eventually submitted nearly all of them for copyright, but declined to include any of them in his next studio release (Dylan would not release any of those recordings to the commercial market until 1975’s The Basement Tapes; and by then, some of those recordings had been bootlegged, usually sourced from an easy-to-find set of publisher’s demos). Instead, Dylan used a different set of songs for John Wesley Harding.

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October 17: Watch Bob Dylan at Guitar Legends, Seville 1991

.. a superb three-song acoustic set. A slightly-at-a-loss Richard Thompson embellishes Dylan’s plaintive singing and light strumming with some virtuoso acoustic guitar work. If ‘Boots of Spanish Leather’  might seem an obvious choice, covers of “Across the borderline’ and ‘Answer Me’ transcend their original selves.
~Clinton Heylin (A Life of Stolen Moments)

Guitar Legends was a concert held over five nights, from October 15 to October 19, 1991, in SevilleSpain, with the aim of positioning the city as an entertainment destination to draw support for Expo ’92 beginning the following April.

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Bob Dylan Sings Big Joe Williams (born October 16, 1903)

The way I think about the blues, comes from what I learned from Big Joe Williams. The blues is more than something to sit home and arrange. What made the real blues singers so great is that they were able to state all the problems they had; but at the same time, they were standing outside of them and could look at them. And in that way, they had them beat. What’s depressing today is that many young singers are trying to get inside the blues, forgetting that those older singers used them to get outside their troubles.
-Bob Dylan (The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan Liner Notes – 1963)

Joseph Lee “Big Joe” Williams (October 16, 1903 – December 17, 1982) was an American Delta blues guitarist, singer and songwriter, notable for the distinctive sound of his nine-string guitar. Performing over four decades, he recorded the songs “Baby Please Don’t Go”, “Crawlin’ King Snake” and “Peach Orchard Mama”, among many others.

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Bob Dylan and Paul Simon – Covers and Duets – Happy Birthday Paul Simon

Bob Dylan and Paul Simon

Alright! It’s my great honor right now to welcome a man to the stage who needs no introduction at all. One of the great songwriters and performers of the modern day. Ladies and gentlemen — Paul Simon!
-Bob Dylan (July 24, 1999)

Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. Simon’s musical career has spanned seven decades with his fame and commercial success beginning as half of the duo Simon & Garfunkel (originally known as Tom & Jerry), formed in 1956 with Art Garfunkel. Simon was responsible for writing nearly all of the pair’s songs including three that reached number one on the U.S. singles charts: “The Sound of Silence”, “Mrs. Robinson”, and “Bridge over Troubled Water”.

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