Stevie Wonder and Bob Dylan – The Connection





bob dylan stevie wonder

“If anybody can be called a genius, he can be. I think it has something to do with his ear, not being able to see or whatever. I go back with him to about the early ‘60s, when he was playing at the Apollo with all that Motown stuff. If nothing else, he played the harmonica incredible, I mean truly incredible. Never knew what to think of him really until he cut Blowin’ In The Wind. That really blew my mind, and I figured I’d better pay attention. I was glad when he did that Rolling Stones tour, cuz it opened up his scene to a whole new crowd of people, which I’m sure has stuck with him over the years. I love everything he does. It’s hard not to. He can do gut-bucket funky stuff really country and then turn around and do modern-progressive whatever you call it. In fact, he might have invented that. he is a great mimic, can imitate everybody, doesn’t take himself seriously and is a true roadhouse musician all the way, with classical overtones, and he does it all with drama and style. I’d like to hear him play with an orchestra. He should probably have his own orchestra.”
~Bob Dylan (about Stevie Wonder – 9 February 1989, Rolling Stone featurette on Stevie Wonder)

Stevie Wonder birthday today (born May 13, 1950):

In this post I will connect Stevie Wonder & Bob Dylan.

  1. Stevie Wonder covering Bob Dylan
  2. Stevie Wonder & Bob Dylan performing together
  3. Bob Dylan about Stevie Wonder (quotes)
  4. May 13: Happy birthday Stevie Wonder (born 1950)

Stevie Wonder covering Bob Dylan

stevie wonder up-tight

Blowin’ in the Wind – From the album Up-Tight (1966)
(additional vocals by Clarence Paul)

Blowin’ in the Wind – TV 1966

Blowin’ in the Wind – Glen Campbell and Stevie Wonder – the Goodtime Hour Show Feb 19, 1969

stevie wonder blowin in the wind

Blowin’ In The Wind – Berkeley Community Theater, 1973.03.04




Stevie Wonder & Bob Dylan performing together

1983 Grammy Awards Song Of The Year

Bob Dylan Rehearses “We Are The World” with Stevie Wonder – January, 1985

USA for Africa – We are the World – January, 1985

Bob Dylan about Stevie Wonder

“I started writing those songs… before, you know… before I could walk! George Harrison told me last night that I’d be singing ‘It’s Alright, Ma’ when I’m 90! Nobody else gives my songs life. It’s up to me to do it… But those songs have a life of their own, too. Jimi Hendrix sang them… Stevie Wonder, Van Morrison and Elvis Presley have sung them.
~Robert Shelton interview, Knightsbridge Restaurant, London, UK – 20 June 1978

Q: Who would you like to write a song with?
Bob Dylan: I don’t know. I should know, maybe with Stevie Wonder.
~Press Conference, Kurhaus Hotel, Travemünde, West Germany – 13 July 1981

Martin Killer: Who are your favorite contemporary singers?
Bob Dylan: Oh, let me see, Joe Cocker, I suppose. Graham Nash can sing. Van Morrison’s fantastic. And so is Stevie Wonder, but of all of them, Joe’s the greatest.
~Martin Killer Interview, New Your City – 5 July 1983

“If anybody can be called a genius, he can be. I think it has something to do with his ear, not being able to see or whatever. I go back with him to about the early ‘60s, when he was playing at the Apollo with all that Motown stuff. If nothing else, he played the harmonica incredible, I mean truly incredible. Never knew what to think of him really until he cut Blowin’ In The Wind. That really blew my mind, and I figured I’d better pay attention. I was glad when he did that Rolling Stones tour, cuz it opened up his scene to a whole new crowd of people, which I’m sure has stuck with him over the years. I love everything he does. It’s hard not to. He can do gut-bucket funky stuff really country and then turn around and do modern-progressive whatever you call it. In fact, he might have invented that. he is a great mimic, can imitate everybody, doesn’t take himself seriously and is a true roadhouse musician all the way, with classical overtones, and he does it all with drama and style. I’d like to hear him play with an orchestra. He should probably have his own orchestra.”
~Bob Dylan (about Stevie Wonder – 9 February 1989, Rolling Stone featurette on Stevie Wonder)

Bob Dylan: Not really. I think that the rap music is in a more pure form connected to blues than the performers who derive their music from Marvin Gaye or Stevie Wonder or somebody like that. You know, Stevie Wonder is still performing, so for that type of music, he’s prominent.
SK: Is it true that Stevie taught you how to sing like yourself on We Are The World?
Bob Dylan: Yeah, I’d forgotten and Stevie reminded me, that’s right.
~London Press Conference, Metropolitan Hotel, London, England – 4 October 1997

 

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-Egil

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