Bob Dylan: Brown Sugar (Jagger/Richards)

bob dylan Jagger richards

Gold coast slave ship bound for cotton fields,
Sold in a market down in new orleans.
Scarred old slaver know he’s doin alright.
Hear him whip the women just around midnight.
Ah brown sugar how come you taste so good
(a-ha) brown sugar, just like a young girl should
A-huh.

“They say things – try to kid you – no, I don’t like the Rolling Stones.”
~Bob Dylan (18 April 1966)

“The Rolling Stones? Who else has come through? Mick Jagger and Keith Richard have come through the same fire that I’ve come through.”
~Bob Dylan (to Robert Shelton, June 1978)

From Wikipedia:

Released 16 April 1971 (UK)
7 May 1971 (US)
Recorded 2–4 December 1969
Genre Hard rock
Length 3:50
Label Rolling Stones Records
Writer(s) Jagger/Richards
Producer Jimmy Miller

Brown Sugar” is a song by The Rolling Stones. It is the opening track and lead single from their 1971 album Sticky FingersRolling Stone magazine ranked it #495 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and at #5 on their list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time.

Rolling-Stones-Brown-Sugar

Though credited, like most of their compositions, to the singer/guitarist pair of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards, the song was primarily the work of Jagger, who wrote it sometime during the filming of Ned Kelly in 1969. Originally recorded over a three-day period at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio in Muscle Shoals, Alabama from 2–4 December 1969, the song was not released until over a year later due to legal wranglings with the band’s former label, though at the request of guitarist Mick Taylor, they debuted the number live during the infamous concert at Altamont on 6 December. The song was written by Jagger with Marsha Hunt in mind; Hunt was Jagger’s secret girlfriend and mother of his first child Karis.
… read more over @ wikipedia

Drums beating, cold english blood runs hot,
Lady of the house wondrin where it’s gonna stop.
House boy knows that he’s doin alright.
You should a heard him just around midnight.
Ah brown sugar how come you taste so good
(a-ha) brown sugar, just like a black girl should
A-huh.

Other notable versions:

original album version:

Live in Texas, 1972:

I bet your mama was a tent show queen, and all her boy
Friends were sweet sixteen.
I’m no schoolboy but I know what I like,
You should have heard me just around midnight.

Little Richard:

Bob Dylan

Dylan premiered this Jagger / Richards classic during the opening show of the October / November 2002 leg of his US tour. The first performance was in Seattle, Washington on October 4, 2002, after which the song was played in the number six slot at every show apart from October 13, when it was replaced by ‘ot Fade Away’. The reason for the song’s inclusion is unclear but it did coincide with the Stones’ much publicized and scrutinized 2002 “Licks” tour. ….  …
Still, with guitarists Larry Campbell and Charlie Sexton on hand to crank out the riffs and add the ‘Wooh-wooh’s to the song’s conclusion, ‘Brown Sugar’ has been one of the more thrilling Bob Dylan live covers of recent years.
~Derek Barker (The Songs He didn’t write)

bob dylan mick jaggerBob Dylan & Mick Jagger

 

Ah brown sugar how come you taste so good
(a-ha) brown sugar, just like a young girl should.

I said yeah, I said yeah, I said yeah, I said
Oh just like a, just like a black girl should.

I said yeah, I said yeah, I said yeah, I said
Oh just like, just like a black girl should.

Bob Dylan did many great cover versions of Stone’s “Brown Sugar” during 2002 (36 performances.. and one in 2003), here are a couple of them.

  • Bob Dylan (vocal & guitar)
  • Charlie Sexton (guitar)
  • Larry Campbell (guitar, mandolin, pedal steel guitar & electric slide guitar)
  • Tony Garnier (bass)
  • George Recile (drums & percussion)

Uptown Theater
Kansas City, Missouri
28 October 2002

First Union Center
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
15 November 2002


unknown date (2002):

 

Check out:

-Egil

3 thoughts on “Bob Dylan: Brown Sugar (Jagger/Richards)”

  1. I remember hearing Bob doing this one along with some Warren Zevon covers in Fairfax, VA on the 2002 tour. Great show. It seems to me that Bob gets energized when he does covers on tour. Keeps the band fresh and his attention engaged, I suppose. And given the stories/rumors of his involvement with a number of his background singers from the ’80’s, an entirely appropriate selection!

  2. Dylan always surprises me with his cover versions, who’d go to see him expecting to hear him do Stones material? Great job,too, if not for the voice it could pass for live Jagger and the boys.

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