Category Archives: Bob Dylan recording sessions

April 27: Bob Dylan 3rd Street-Legal recording session, 27 April 1978


bob dylan street-legal

“On this album, I took a few steps backward, but I also took a bunch of steps forward because I had a lot of time to concentrate on it. I also had the band sounding like I want it to sound. It’s got that organ sound from ‘Blonde on Blonde’ again. That’s something that has been missing.”
~Bob Dylan (to Robert Hilburn – May 1978)

Jonathan Cott interview – Sept. 1978:
Jonathan Cott: What do you think of all the criticisms of Street Legal?
Bob Dylan: I read some of them. In fact, I didn’t understand them. I don’t think these people have had the experiences I’ve had to write those songs. The reviews didn’t strike me as being particularly interesting one way or another, or as compelling to my particular scene. I don’t know who these people are. They don’t travel in the same crowd, anyway. So it would be like me criticizing Pancho Villa.

bob dylan street legal2

First of all… “Street-Legal” is a fantastic album. I have never “understood” all the criticism it got.. and still gets, and I even dig the original overall sound & production.

The first & second recording session (April 25 & 26) did not produce much (probably only a master of “We Better Talk This Over”), but on this  sessions we (probably) got 4 masters: No Time To Think, Where Are You Tonight? (Journey Through Dark Heat), True Love Tends To Forget & Changing Of The Guards.

Continue reading April 27: Bob Dylan 3rd Street-Legal recording session, 27 April 1978

April 24: Bob Dylan: The 8th and last Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan session 1963




bob dylan freewheelin

 Freewheelin’ in it’s released form is essentially a “best of” from one of the most creative years in Dylan’s life. The lag between sessions resulted in an album whose sound metamorphosed at least twice.
~Clinton Heylin (BD – The Recording Sessions)

Dylan nailed 5 master versions for “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” @ this important recording session.

bob dylan freewheelin shots

Continue reading April 24: Bob Dylan: The 8th and last Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan session 1963

April 14: Bob Dylan – The 4th Infidels session, NYC 1983

Infidels

I’m usually either here or on the West Coast or down in the Caribbean. Me and another
guy have a boat down there. Jokerman kinda came to me in the islands. It’s very
mystical. The shapes there, and shadows, seem to be so ancient. The song was sorta
inspired by these spirits they call jumbis.
~Bob Dylan (to Kurt Loder, March 1984)

Studio A
Power Station
New York City, New York
14 April 1983
4th Infidels recording session. Produced by Mark Knopfler and Bob Dylan.

Continue reading April 14: Bob Dylan – The 4th Infidels session, NYC 1983

March 14: Bob Dylan recorded “Shooting Star” in 1989





bob dylan shooting star

Seen a shooting star tonight
And I thought of you
You were trying to break into another world
A world I never knew
I always kind of wondered
If you ever made it through
Seen a shooting star tonight
And I thought of you

“Shooting star” was his first album closer since “Every Grain of Sand” to share that slightly somnambulant feel, a gorgeous melody, caressed vocal and an abiding conviction that there are two kinds of people, good (i.e. saved) and lost people.
~Clinton Heylin (Still on the Road: The Songs of Bob Dylan Vol. 2, . 1974-2008)

This was the 6th “Oh Mercy” recording session, and Dylan also landed another master: “Everything Is Broken”.

The Studio
New Orleans, Louisiana
14 or 15 March 1989
6th Oh Mercy recording session, produced by Daniel Lanois

Continue reading March 14: Bob Dylan recorded “Shooting Star” in 1989

March 9: Bob Dylan’s 10th (and final) Blonde On Blonde recording session in 1966




blonde on blonde

The closest I ever got to the sound I hear in my mind was on individual bands in the Blonde on Blonde album. It’s that thin, that wild mercury sound. It’s metallic and bright gold, with whatever that conjures up. That’s my particular sound.
~Bob Dylan (to Ron Rosenbaum – Nov 1977)

He had a piano in his room at the hotel and during the day I would go up there and he would teach me a song. I would be like a cassette machine. I would play the song over and over on the piano for him. This served a double purpose. One, he could concentrate on writing the lyrics and didn’t have to mess with playing the piano; two, I could go to the studio early that night and teach it to the band before he even got there, so they could be playing the song before he even walked through the door.
~Al Kooper (talking about BoB recording sessions)

bob dylan al kooper 1966

Columbia Music Row Studios
Nashville, Tennessee
9-10 March 1966

Produced by Bob Johnston

Songs:

Continue reading March 9: Bob Dylan’s 10th (and final) Blonde On Blonde recording session in 1966