Category Archives: Bob Dylan recording sessions

Jan 6: Bob Dylan – First recording session for “Under The Red Sky” in 1990





bob dylan under the red sky

I made this record, Under the Red Sky, with Don Was, but at the same time I was also doing the Wilburys record. I don’t know how it happened that I got into both albums at the same time.
~Bob Dylan (to Jonathan Lethem, Aug 2006)

It’s a magnificent album, really, and I love every performance on it.
~Paul Williams (from Bob Dylan: Mind Out of Time – Performing Artist 1986-1990 and Beyond)

Oceanway Studios
Los Angeles, California
6 January 1990
Produced by Don Was, David Was and Jack Frost

Continue reading Jan 6: Bob Dylan – First recording session for “Under The Red Sky” in 1990

Dec 30: Bob Dylan Blood On The Tracks, 6th & final recording session 1974





blood-on-the-tracks-album-cover

The second session @ Minneapolis’ Sound 80 Studios, and the last recording session for “Blood On The Tracks”.

With the first session being a success, Dylan was more relaxed for this session. He knew & trusted the people he was working with. He was also more open to suggestions. The first song he wanted to try was the pivotal “Tangled Up In Blue”; the master take here proved to even top the brilliant New York version.

In New York “Tangled Up In Blue” had been recorded in the key of E (open tuning configuration), in Minneapolis Dylan first tried it in the key of G. Odegard then suggested: “..I think it would be better, livelier, if we moved it up to A with capos. It would kick ass up a notch” (quote from the book “A Simple Twist of Fate: Bob Dylan and the Making of Blood on the Tracks”). And so they did.. & the master take of one of the greatest songs in history was recorded.

Sound 80 Studio
Minneapolis, Minnesota
30 December 1974 
6th and last Blood On The Tracks recording session

Producer: David Zimmerman
Engineer: Paul Martinson

Continue reading Dec 30: Bob Dylan Blood On The Tracks, 6th & final recording session 1974

December 6: The 7th Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan recording session in 1962





bob dylan - the_freewheelin

 Freewheelin’ in it’s released form is essentially a “best of” from one of the most creative years in Dylan’s life. The lag between sessions resulted in an album whose sound metamorphosed at least twice.
~Clinton Heylin (BD – The Recording Sessions)

Dylan nailed 3 master versions for “The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan” @ this important recording session.

bob dylan freewheelin shots

Continue reading December 6: The 7th Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan recording session in 1962

November 29: Bob Dylan – Third (and final) recording session for “John Wesley Harding” in 1967





bob-dylan-john-wesley-harding-1967

JW: John Wesley Harding – why did you call the album that?
BD: We… I called it that because I had that song John Wesley Harding. It didn’t mean anything to me. I called it that, Jann, ‘cause I had the song John Wesley Harding, which started out to be a long ballad. I was gonna write a ballad on… Like maybe one of those old cowboy… You know, a real long ballad. But in the middle of the second verse, I got
tired. I had a tune, and I didn’t want to waste the tune, it was a nice little melody, so I just wrote a quick third verse, and I recorded that. But it was a silly little song….
~Bob Dylan to Jann Wenner November 29, 1969

This quiet masterpiece, which manages to sound both authoritative and tentative (a mix that gave it a highly contemporary feel), is neither a rock nor a folk album—and certainly isn’t folk-rock. It isn’t categorisable at all.
~Michael Gray (The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia)

47 years ago Bob Dylan entered Columbia Studio A, Nashville Tennessee tempting his third (and final) recording session for “John Wesley Harding”.

Continue reading November 29: Bob Dylan – Third (and final) recording session for “John Wesley Harding” in 1967

November 22: Bob Dylan: second recording session for.. “Bob Dylan”, 1961

bob dylan album 1962

CBS is proud to introduce a major new figure in American folk music—Bob Dylan.
Excitement has been running high since the young man with a guitar ambled into a
recording studio for two sessions in November, 1961. For at only 20, Dylan is the most unusual
new talent in American folk music.
His talent takes many forms. He is one of the most compelling white blues singers ever
recorded. He is a songwriter of exceptional facility and cleverness. He is an uncommonly
skillful guitar player and harmonica player.
~Stacey Williams (“Bob Dylan” LP. liner notes – March 1962)

Dylan comes across as obsessed with the romance of dying, but the speed, energy and attack
in his guitar, harmonica and voice show how fresh and excellently ‘unprofessional’ he was.
…..
Yet what comes through from the album as a whole is a remarkable skill and more than a hint
of a highly distinctive vision.
~Michael Gray (The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia)

Continue reading November 22: Bob Dylan: second recording session for.. “Bob Dylan”, 1961