Category Archives: folk

Look out for: Phoebe Hunt

Photo courtesy of Dowellshots

ABOUT (taken from her website):
Singer-songwriter-instrumentalist Phoebe Hunt just can’t stay planted in one spot for long, and that insatiable wanderlust drives everything she does — from mastering myriad musical styles to living the gypsy life of a touring musician.

Sugar:

An Austin-to-Nashville émigré, the gifted Americana-pop artist headed to another musical center, Los Angeles, to record her self-titled debut EP with producer Matt Rollings, who helped create a captivating introduction to her solo work. Propelled by her genre-jumping fiddle, Hunt wraps her sultry voice and sincere lyrics right around listeners’ souls with each song. Leaping easily from country to Western swing to jazz,G ypsy and blues, she also shifts moods from innocent and playful to seductive and intimate in the blink of a beat. But the quality that shines through most of all is her honesty.

A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, Hunt spent her college years touring around the Lone Star state with folk trio the Hudsons. After graduation, she hopped in the Belleville Outfit’s van, spending four years touring nationally with the renowned Americana act. She also shared songwriting and lead-vocal credits on two albums.

Hunt spent the past year in Nashville, honing her songwriting skills and touring with Kentuckian cellist and songwriter, Ben Sollee.

Meet Phoebe Hunt, and fall in love…

Her new EP:

 

– Hallgeir

Videos of the day: Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros (on Kimmel)

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros did two fantastic performances with That’s What’s Up and Man on Fire on Kimmel TV- Show last night, both songs are from their second album, Here, which came out May 29.

I saw them at last years Oya Festival in Oslo it was good, but my expectations were perhaps a bit too high…

After seeing these two clips I really look forward seeing them again this summer at Vikedal Roots Festival. I Believe it’s gonna be a better concert than the one in Oslo, I think they’re a better band now.

That’s What’s Up:

Man on Fire:

– Hallgeir

Video Premiere: Para by Calexico

The Americana/alt. country band Calexico have a new album called Algiers coming out at the end of the summer, and yesterday they premiered their new video to the track Para.

Great track, very intense.

The new album will be released September 11th.

Para:

Or you can listen or download the song here:

Track list for Algiers:

01 “Epic”
02 “Splitter”
03 “Sinner In The Sea”
04 “Fortune Teller”
05 “Para”
06 “Algiers”
07 “Maybe On Monday”
08 “Puerto”
09 “Better And Better”
10 “No Te Vayas”
11 “Hush”
12 “Solstice of a Vanishing Mind”

– Hallgeir

Look out for: Saturday City

Saturday City is an accoustic 60’s inspired indie/pop duo consisting of brothers, Magnus (29) and Stian (23) Gulbrandsen from Moss, Norway. They have a pleasant, mellow but fresh sound that reminds me of Iron & Wine or William Fitzsimmons but with the added harmony parts.

We’ve played together in a couple of bands that just stopped functioning, we then decided to go for it, just the two of us.

– interview NRK

Stian is also a member of  Death By Unga Bunga (Oya Festival booking), we will check them out later this summer. Magnus is also a guitarist in The Dahlmanns.

Misty Grass:

Their musical favourites include Townes Van Zandt, Bruce Springsteen, early Bee Gees, John Martyn and Beatles (and more). Very good taste in music and the influences seep into their lovely songs. They’ve described their music as “Folk/country-ish but with a “beatlesque” touch”. That’s about right, I think.
Continue reading Look out for: Saturday City

The best songs: The Ghost of Tom Joad by Bruce Springsteen

The Ghost of Tom Joad is a fantastic and often overlooked song by Bruce Springsteen. It is the title track on his album from 1995. The album, The Ghost of Tom Joad, has a focus on storytelling. It is largely accoustic and the songs are stories of people in difficulties and struggles. The influence of Guthrie and Dylan is clear.

Recorded sometime April–June 1995 at Thrill Hill West (Bruce’s Los Angeles home studio). Springsteen handles guitar and vocals and his 4-man backing band on this recording is Danny Federici (keyboards), Garry Tallent (bass), Marty Rifkin (pedal steel, dobro) and Gary Mallaber (drums). (from Brucebase)

The character Tom Joad is the lead character in John Steinbeck’s classic 1939 novel The Grapes of Wrath, is mentioned in the title and narrative. Near the end of the story, Tom makes his famous “I’ll be there” speech, which is also noted in the lyrics.

The idea is that the ghost of Tom Joad, the spirit of working together as a community, will prevail in times of great injustice and depression. I think it means that our times are mirror images of past times, the ghost of the depression in the late twenties to the early forties.

The song also takes inspiration from The Ballad of Tom Joad by Woody Guthrie and by the John Ford film The Grapes of Wrath.

Another inspiration is this speech by George Bush in 1990:

“Until now, the world we’ve known has been a world divided – a world of barbed wire and concrete block, conflict and cold war. Now, we can see a new world coming into view. A world in which there is the very real prospect of a new world order. In the words of Winston Churchill, a ‘world order’ in which ‘the principles of justice and fair play … protect the weak against the strong …’ “

Springsteen was clearly ironically quoting Bush’s speech when he wrote the line, “Welcome to the new world order” in the first verse.

So it’s a song with several origins and a very political song.
It was originally done as a sombre protest/folk song by Springsteen but has later been done in a radically louder arrangement by Rage Against the Machine.

Men walkin’ ‘long the railroad tracks
Goin’ someplace there’s no goin’ back
Highway patrol choppers comin’ up over the ridge
Hot soup on a campfire under the bridge
Shelter line stretchin’ round the corner
Welcome to the new world order
Families sleepin’ in their cars in the southwest
No home no job no peace no rest

The highway is alive tonight
But nobody’s kiddin’ nobody about where it goes
I’m sittin’ down here in the campfire light
Searchin’ for the ghost of Tom Joad

Bruce Springsteen  has also performed the song in various arrangements, solo in very quiet shows and as a more hard and up-tempo rock song.

Here’s the fabulous album version from 1995:

He pulls prayer book out of his sleeping bag
Preacher lights up a butt and takes a drag
Waitin’ for when the last shall be first and the first shall be last
In a cardboard box ‘neath the underpass
Got a one-way ticket to the promised land
You got a hole in your belly and gun in your hand
Sleeping on a pillow of solid rock
Bathin’ in the city aqueduct

The highway is alive tonight
But where it’s headed everybody knows
I’m sittin’ down here in the campfire light
Waitin’ on the ghost of Tom Joad

The great cover version by Rage Against The Machine:

Continue reading The best songs: The Ghost of Tom Joad by Bruce Springsteen