Tag Archives: The Pretenders

Chrissie Hynde Sings Bob Dylan – Happy Birthday Chrissie Hynde

Chrissie Hynde’s a rock & roll singer who really should go back and study some country music. She should go deeply into the heart of that stuff and then come back bout. Because Chrissie Hynde is a good rhythm guitar player. That’s all you gotta be is a rhythm guitar player and singer, and she writes good, and she’s got good thoughts. She knows what’s right and wrong.
-Bob Dylan (to Kurt Loder, October 1987)

Christine Ellen Hynde (born September 7, 1951) is an American singer-songwriter and musician. She is a founding member and the guitarist, lead vocalist, and primary songwriter of the rock band The Pretenders, as well as its only constant member.

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Dec 27: Bob Dylan released John Wesley Harding in 1967





john-wesley-harding

I heard the sound that Gordon Lightfoot was getting, with Charlie McCoy and Kenny Buttrey. I’d used Charlie and Kenny both before, and I figured if he could get that sound, I could…. but we couldn’t get it. (Laughs) It was an attempt to get it, but it didn’t come off. We got a different sound… I don’t know what you’d call that… It’s a muffled sound.
~Bob Dylan (to Jann Wenner November 29, 1969)

“I didn’t intentionally come out with some kind of mellow sound……. I would have liked … more steel guitar, more piano. More music … I didn’t sit down and plan that sound.”
~Bob Dylan 1971

This quiet masterpiece, which manages to sound both authoritative and tentative (a mix that gave it a highly contemporary feel), is neither a rock nor a folk album—and certainly isn’t folk-rock. It isn’t categorisable at all.
~Michael Gray (BD Encyclopedia)

Continue reading Dec 27: Bob Dylan released John Wesley Harding in 1967

Today: Bob Dylan released “John Wesley Harding” in 1967, 46 years ago

bob-dylan-john-wesley-harding-1967

 I heard the sound that Gordon Lightfoot was getting, with Charlie McCoy and Kenny Buttrey. I’d used Charlie and Kenny both before, and I figured if he could get that sound, I could…. but we couldn’t get it. (Laughs) It was an attempt to get it, but it didn’t come off. We got a different sound… I don’t know what you’d call that… It’s a muffled sound.
~Bob Dylan (to Jann Wenner November 29, 1969)

Continue reading Today: Bob Dylan released “John Wesley Harding” in 1967, 46 years ago

Today: The Rolling Stones released “Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! …” in 1970

rolling-stones-get-yer-ya-yas-out

“I have no doubt that it’s the best rock concert ever put on record.”
~Lester Bangs

Yeah, I was at the Garden when this was being recorded, and I had a great time. But despite Mick Taylor’s guitar on “Love in Vain” and the spruced-up “Live With Me,” there’s not a song here that isn’t better somewhere else–including the two Chuck Berry covers and the one-act “Midnight Rambler.”  B
~Robert Christgau

Recorded during their American tour in late 1969, and centered around live versions of material from the Beggars Banquet-Let It Bleed era. Often acclaimed as one of the top live rock albums of all time, its appeal has dimmed a little today…  it’s certainly the Stones’ best official live recording.
~Richie Unterberger (allmusic.com)

Carol – 27 Nov 1969:

From Wikipedia:

Released 4 September 1970
Recorded 26 November 1969, Baltimore,Maryland, United States and 27–28 November 1969, New York City, New York, United States
January–February 1970 (vocal overdubs)
Genre Hard rock, blues-rock
Length 47:36
Language English
Label London (US), Decca (UK)
Producer The Rolling Stones, Glyn Johns

Many, including The Rolling Stones, consider this their first official full-length live release, despite the appearance of the US-only Got Live If You Want It! in 1966 as a contractual obligation product. One reason for releasing a live album was to counter the release of the Live’r Than You’ll Ever Be bootleg recording of an Oakland (9 November 1969) performance on the same tour, a recording which was even reviewed in Rolling Stone magazine.

Classic bootleg concert: The Rolling Stones – “Live’r Than You’ll Ever Be” [Full Album]:

Having not toured since April 1967, The Rolling Stones were eager to hit the road by 1969. With their two most recent albums, Beggars Banquet and Through the Past, Darkly (Big Hits Vol. 2) being highly praised, audiences were anticipating their live return. Their 1969 American Tour’s trek during November into December, with Terry Reid, B.B. King (replaced on some dates by Chuck Berry) and Ike and Tina Turner as supporting acts, played to packed houses. The tour was the first for Mick Taylor with the Stones, having replaced Brian Jones shortly before Jones’ death in July; the performances prominently showcased the guitar interplay of Taylor with Keith Richards.

rolling stones live 1969

The performances captured for this release were recorded on 27–28 November 1969 at New York City’s Madison Square Garden, while “Love in Vain” was recorded in Baltimore, Maryland on 26 November 1969. Overdubbing was undertaken during January and February 1970 in London’s Olympic Studios. No instruments were overdubbed, although on bootlegs, examples are known of Richards trying out different guitar parts (e.g. a guitar solo on “Jumpin’ Jack Flash”). The finished product featured new lead vocals on half the tracks, and added backing vocals by Richards on several others.

rolling stones live 1969

The title of the album was adapted from the song “Get Yer Yas Yas Out” by Blind Boy Fuller. The phrase used in Fuller’s song was “get your yas yas out the door”.

Review of the “40th Anniversary Deluxe Box Set” from Sean Murphy – popmatters.com:

Best live album ever? Who cares. What is beyond dispute is that 1970’s Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out is certainly the best live album the Rolling Stones ever recorded. And here we are, 40 years after the concerts took place in NYC at Madison Square Garden. World’s Greatest Band + World’s Greatest Stage = Deluxe Box Set! What are we looking at here? The original, remastered album? Check. Six unreleased tracks? Check. Bonus disc of opening acts B.B. King and Ike & Tina Turner? Check. Bonus DVD mixing live songs and offstage antics? Check. Obligatory booklet with critical essays and never-before seen photos? Check. Caveat emptor: for anyone thinking of shelling out $40-to-$60, be warned that the extra Stones material and the DVD are both less than 30 minutes in length. For Stones enthusiasts, this newly unearthed bounty is essential and price should be no object.     ...read more

 

Track listing:

Side one
1. “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” (November 27, 1969: Madison Square Garden, New York City) 4:02
2. “Carol” (Chuck Berry) – (November 28, 1969: MSG (first show)) 3:47
3. “Stray Cat Blues” (November 28, 1969: MSG (first show)) 3:41
4. “Love in Vain” (Robert Johnson†) – (November 26, 1969: Civic Center, Baltimore) 4:57
5. “Midnight Rambler” (November 28, 1969: MSG (second show)) 9:05

Side two
6. “Sympathy for the Devil” (November 28, 1969: MSGarden (first show)) 6:52
7. “Live with Me” (November 28, 1969: MSG (second show)) 3:03
8. “Little Queenie” (Chuck Berry) – (November 28, 1969: MSG (first show)) 4:33
9. “Honky Tonk Women” (November 27, 1969: MSG) 3:35
10. “Street Fighting Man” (November 28, 1969: MSG (first show)) 4:03

Personnel:

The Rolling Stones
  • Mick Jagger – lead vocals, harmonica
  • Keith Richards – lead, rhythm and Resonator guitar, backing vocals
  • Mick Taylor – lead, rhythm and slide guitar
  • Charlie Watts – drums, percussion
  • Bill Wyman – bass guitar
Additional personnel
  • Ian Stewart – piano
  • J. P. Hawkes – tambourine
  • Recording and mixing engineer – Glyn Johns
  • Recording by Wally Heider Mobile
  • Front cover photograph by David Bailey

Jumpin’ Jack Flash @ Madison Square Garden, NYC – 1969:

Album of the day:

Other September-04:

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